Thread: Family Guy general discussion/upcoming episode thread



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  1. #5161
    Al Jeany apologist skully the poltergeist's Avatar
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    family guy is bread


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  3. #5163
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    Quote Originally Posted by John95 View Post
    @Grifty McGrift, I also instantly thought of Three Hundred Big Boys from Futurama.
    It's probably closer in tone to Big Boys given the cash themed plot, but I've always been a fan of episodes like that so I'll gladly take a Family Guy attempt at it (Not even the first time they've done it I suppose given that "Valentine's Day in Quahog" was a thing).
    How to remaster

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  5. #5164
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    @Shaunbadia, That is why I thought of that episode because they both involve cash. And honestly, that one popped into my head before 22 Short Films About Springfield.
    Family Guy Season 18 Ratings - Yacht Rocky: 1.5/5 Bri-Da: 2.5/5 Absolutely Babulous: 1.5/5 Disney's The Reboot: 1.5/5 Cat Fight: 1.5/5 Peter & Lois' Wedding: .5/5 Heart Burn: TBD Shanksgiving: TBD
    American Dad! Season 15 Ratings - Fantasy Baseball: 1.5/5 I Am the Jeans: The Gina Lavetti Story: 0/5 Stan & Francine & Connie & Ted: 0/5 Rabbit Ears: 1.5/5 Jeff and the Dank Ass Weed Factory: 1/5 Lost Boys: 0/5 Shark?!: 1/5 The Long March: 2/5 The Hall Monitor and the Lunch Lady: 0/5 Wild Women Do: 2/5 An Irish Goodbye: 3/5 Stompe le Monde: 0/5 Mom Sauce: 0/5 Hamerican Dad!: 0/5 Demolition Daddy: 0/5 Pride Before the Fail: .5/5 Enter Stanman: 0/5 No Weddings and a Funeral: 0/5 Eight Fires: 1.5/5 The Hand That Rocks the Rogu: 0/5 Downtown: TBD Cheek to Cheek: A Stripper's Story: TBD

  6. #5165
    Wrote the book on flimflammin Grifty McGrift's Avatar
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    I think it'll be more similar to 22 Films as they probably won't go back to characters who's already had the money.

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    SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5

    [EDITOR'S NOTE: Audio descriptions for tonight's episodes of BOB'S BURGERS, THE SIMPSONS, GHOSTED, FAMILY GUY and THE LAST MAN ON EARTH are available on the SAP Audio Channel.]

    "FAMILY GUY" - (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) CC-AD-HDTV 720p-Dolby Digital 5.1

    PETER GETS FIRED THREE DIFFERENT WAYS ON AN ALL-NEW "FAMILY GUY" SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5, ON FOX

    The Late Carrie Fisher Makes Her Final Guest-Voice Appearance

    In a special anthology-style episode, Peter gets fired from his job at the brewery in the signature styles of three famous Hollywood film directors in the all-new "Three Directors" episode of FAMILY GUY airing Sunday, Nov. 5 (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (FG-1418) (TV-14 D, L, S, V)

    Voice Cast: Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Brian Griffin, Quagmire, and Tom Tucker; Alex Borstein as Lois Griffin; Seth Green as Chris Griffin; Mila Kunis as Meg; Mike Henry as Cleveland Brown; and Patrick Warburton as Joe.

    Guest Voice Cast: Carrie Fisher as Angela, Adam West as Mayor West

    Well, here it is. In one month, the last episode with Carrie Fisher voice's role is airing. (Also Adam West had a role, which means we'll have 2 more episodes left to hear his voice by then.) It's be interesting to see how this episode will be handled, in three different movie-director styles. This is also the last season 14 Production Cycle episode to air, before we officially move on to the rest of season 15 Production Cycle.
    Simpsons: 4 > 6 = 7 > 5 > 3 > 8 > 2 > 14 > 15 > 13 = 10 > 9 > 16 > 20 > 1 > 24 = 21 > 26 > 22 = 25 > 23 > 19 = 27 > 18 = 28 > 12 > 11 > 17 = 29

    Family Guy: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 > 5 = 6 > 15 > 16 > 10 > 14 > > 7 = 11 = 9 > 8 > 12 = 13

    American Dad: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 > 6 > 5 > 8 > 9 > 7 = 11 > 10 > 13 (so far) > 12

    The Cleveland Show: 2 > 1 > 4 > 3

    Futurama: 5 > 4 = 1 > 2 = 3 > 7 > 6

    Rick and Morty: 2 > 1 > 3

  8. #5167


    Quote Originally Posted by fas1997 View Post
    SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5

    [EDITOR'S NOTE: Audio descriptions for tonight's episodes of BOB'S BURGERS, THE SIMPSONS, GHOSTED, FAMILY GUY and THE LAST MAN ON EARTH are available on the SAP Audio Channel.]

    "FAMILY GUY" - (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) CC-AD-HDTV 720p-Dolby Digital 5.1

    PETER GETS FIRED THREE DIFFERENT WAYS ON AN ALL-NEW "FAMILY GUY" SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5, ON FOX

    The Late Carrie Fisher Makes Her Final Guest-Voice Appearance

    In a special anthology-style episode, Peter gets fired from his job at the brewery in the signature styles of three famous Hollywood film directors in the all-new "Three Directors" episode of FAMILY GUY airing Sunday, Nov. 5 (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (FG-1418) (TV-14 D, L, S, V)

    Voice Cast: Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Brian Griffin, Quagmire, and Tom Tucker; Alex Borstein as Lois Griffin; Seth Green as Chris Griffin; Mila Kunis as Meg; Mike Henry as Cleveland Brown; and Patrick Warburton as Joe.

    Guest Voice Cast: Carrie Fisher as Angela, Adam West as Mayor West

    Well, here it is. In one month, the last episode with Carrie Fisher voice's role is airing. (Also Adam West had a role, which means we'll have 2 more episodes left to hear his voice by then.) It's be interesting to see how this episode will be handled, in three different movie-director styles. This is also the last season 14 Production Cycle episode to air, before we officially move on to the rest of season 15 Production Cycle.
    I saw the trailer with the clip of Angela looking hot. It looks good and she it looks like she'll go out on a high note. I hope the same goes for Adam.

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwHhdQh13yc

    I guess it's kinda cool that they remembered that Ernie has a wife.

    Though sadly, my expectations for this episode are not as high now as they were prior to last night.

  10. #5169


    After seeing that brief clip, I was expecting more but my hopes are low. Nice to see Ernie's wife again but they could have done a lot.

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    @sideshow ken, Actually, I believe that the bit with Lois and Nicole fighting actually can work if they're able to cause the same amount of mayhem and destruction that Peter and Ernie often cause despite only slap fighting and not throwing actual punches so long as they don't make it too long like some of the more recent chicken fights.

    The reason why my expectations for this episode are lowered is not because of this clip, but because of how bad last night's episode was with it's very AD! like feel in regards to what little fucks were given and how boring it was. It's lowered my expectations for Follow the Money due to me fearing that it'll pull a Family Plan by having an interesting idea (basically Family Guy's answer to 22 Short Films About Springfield and Three Thousand Big Boys) and just completely shitting all over it.

  12. #5171


    I recently found a blog post which showcases the flaws of the show currently. It reminded me of the hit video The Fall of The Simpsons:

    http://loser-city.com/features/all-y...-of-family-guy

    For those who can't access the link:

    In the third episode of Family Guy’s twelfth season, “Quagmire’s Quagmire,” eponymous character Glenn Quagmire meets Sonya, the woman of his dreams: someone as perverse and predatory as himself. For a while they enjoy a life of debauched sexual chemistry, but soon the depravity becomes too much even for Quagmire: After Sonya demands a grueling multiple-times-a-day sex regimen and strongarms him into having sex with his transgender father, she kidnaps and sexually tortures him off-camera, leaving Peter, Joe and Cleveland to find him and restore equilibrium to the program. Just before the next episode inevitably wipes the slate clean, Quagmire morosely remarks, “My dad’s pregnant.” Cut to credits.

    I remember what my reaction was upon hearing this joke for the first time. It wasn’t outrage or titillation, and it certainly wasn’t amusement. It was utter indifference. Family Guy had somehow come to the point where something as obscene as a transgender incest joke was not only not shocking or transgressive but passé and predictable. My expectations for the program became nonexistent; when I did seldom tune in, it was only out of habit.

    It is perhaps not surprising that Family Guy has ended up at this place, funneling vulgar taboos through a veneer of pop culture pastiche that is witless and self-indulgent. Some would say that this has always been the program’s modus operandi, but I would (and will) argue that this is not the case. Something in the show’s DNA has slowly but deeply and irretrievably altered since it was resurrected from cancellation over a decade ago, and considering that millions of people still watch Family Guy every Sunday, it may be worth examining what that something is and why it happened.

    There’s an early episode of Family Guy that begins with Peter and his family watching an episode of Little House on the Prairie. The gag is that the father in the program keeps putting obstacles in front of his blind daughter for her to run into, like footstools and frying pans, and then gently chides her for not knowing her way around the house. The joke culminates when he guides her to a ladder leading out the window instead of to her bunk. We then cut to Peter, who muses, “Geez, life was a lot tougher back then.”

    This seems like a simple gag, and it is, but it’s important to take a moment to analyze its construction. The father’s whimsical cruelty towards his daughter is the windup that leads to the joke (Peter’s clueless assessment of the program), not the joke itself. Certainly some of the humor comes from the mean spirited nature of the buildup, the “naughtiness” of such a situation, but that mean spiritedness, crucially, is not the payoff of the joke.

    Compare this to a joke from a more recent episode. Peter has a Chinese drycleaner recommended to him, but when he comes to the street where it’s supposed to be he finds two drycleaners right next to each other. To figure out which one is the Chinese business, he looks at the masthead of each one: one of them reads “Spencer’s Cleaners,” the other “Super Cowboy USA Hot Dog Rocket Ship American Cleaners Number One.” “That’s probably it,” Peter remarks of the latter, and walks in. Naturally, as is the stereotype of Asian business owners, the elderly proprietor is a greedy, truculent hobgoblin.

    The setup and the punchline of this joke are one and the same: “Chinese businesses sometimes utilize imperfect English and often have difficult owners.” It is a lazy observation tinged in bigotry, such a tired gag that it’s remarkable more for its datedness than its potential to offend. If this premise were to occur in an earlier Family Guy episode it’s not hard to imagine Peter walking in and finding the business with the ridiculous name to be run by bumbling hicks or charlatans, whereas “Spencer’s” would be owned by a perfectly fair-weather Asian man in his 30s. The joke may not have shed all of its problematic elements in this way, but at least it would be unexpected, subverting the viewer’s basest assumptions. As it is, simple, untampered racism is both premise and reward.

    There is a world of difference between using cruel humor as a means to an end and that cruelty being an end in and of itself. It is the line between a lampoon and an insult, a satire or simple bullying. In the nearly twenty years since its debut, Family Guy has changed from plucky upstart to brawny gatekeeper. There is no target too easy for this show to shoot at, no joke worth stretching for if a simpler one is already close at hand. Two or three laughs per episode can’t be considered significant when any given program will have dozens of one-liners, puns and parodies that don’t land. As allegorical shorthand for a certain lifestyle philosophy of cynicism and juvenilia, Family Guy is a roaring success. As comedy, it is valueless. And the tragedy is that this value was not stolen from it but given up willingly, over years of increasing stakes in its success and a decreasing desire to earn its place.

    In order to fairly assess Family Guy and its impact one must admit, however grudgingly, that the show has a thorough and at times masterful understanding of the traditions of American comedy. From Groucho Marx to Harold Ramis, Joan Rivers to Judy Garland, Huckleberry Hound to Space Ghost Coast to Coast, there are few wells that the show does not drink from. Walter Murphy, bandleader of Family Guy’s 40-piece orchestra, has gone on record as being astonished by show creator Seth McFarlane’s grasp of pop history, and this love of the entertainment arts bleeds through unmistakably even during the most dire episodes. When its trademark hybridization of camp, grotesquery and absurdism is running on all cylinders, the results can be a thing of beauty: consider when the show pivots to a nearly unabridged reenactment of The Music Man’s “Shipoopi” during an unrelated episode about football, or the wistful soft-shoe routine performed by a brigade of aborted Prom Night fetuses, or the first Giant Chicken Fight that absolutely derails the episode with a fistfight between Peter and a man in a mascot suit that’s positively bloated with early ‘90s blockbuster action clichés and all the more joyfully ridiculous for it. Family Guy at its best is total fucking nonsense, an animated laissez-faire variety show hosted by Gene Kelly, staffed by potheads and scripted by a man with the world’s most impeccable VHS collection.

    And indeed, Family Guy’s most infamous feature–the cutaway gags, or “Manatee Jokes” as satirized by South Park, frequently pop culture lampoons or non sequiturs that are jammed into the episode with no regard to the show’s overall plot–are neither as rare on television nor egregious for this show in particular as the program’s detractors would have you believe. The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show was structured in a not-dissimilar way, with a core story that fumbled along at a snail’s pace and which was always keen to move out of the way for whatever pun or parody happened to grace the writer’s fancy at the time of production. This style is rarely seen in narrative comedy, but it isn’t unheard of, and is perfectly in keeping with Family Guy’s reverence for its comedic forbears.

    This paradox is what Family Guy excels at: structurally formulaic and obsessed with vintage, while also being chaotic and disinterested in conventional narrative. In its best moments, it walks a tightrope that other programs wouldn’t even dream of and crosses it as though it were the easiest thing in the world.

    Then there are its other moments.

    The first time I noticed there was something deeply amiss with Family Guy’s modern execution was when I saw the Aquaman rape joke. A woman is being sexually assaulted on a beach, with Aquaman a few feet away in the water. The joke is ostensibly making fun of Aquaman’s powers and ineptitude as a superhero: he haplessly tosses a starfish at the rapist, calls a few fish over to splash around, etc. The joke culminates with the rape victim screaming “He’s hurting me!” and Aquaman tersely replying “Yeah, well maybe you shouldn’t have led him on.”

    Ha…ha?

    Family Guy had always been risqué, and its jokes always carried the potential to offend, but before this gag it had never been quite so…mean, and pointlessly so at that. Regardless of the inherent absurdity of the scenario, or whether or not Aquaman is the focus of ridicule and not the rape victim (both of which are debatable), there is simply nothing comedic about watching someone endure a prolonged sexual assault. At the time this joke felt like an outlier, a comedic misfire not to be repeated, but soon it seemed to become the new model for Family Guy’s M.O. going forward.

    Like many other “edgy” comedies, Family Guy always chooses to hide behind the excuse that it considers no boundaries sacred and picks on everyone equally. But this can’t explain the litany of vicious insults directed at Joe for his being handicapped that occur in nearly every episode, or why daughter Meg started enduring ceaseless humiliation from the entire cast due to her simple crime of being homely and boring. It doesn’t explain the joke about Stewie (the baby) getting raped in a closet during a yard sale, or the joke about Quagmire saying he’ll find his adopted daughter again (who he has spent the entirety of the episode bonding with) when she turns 18.

    Some people will say these jokes are “satire.” Fine: What are they satires of? Generic, “wholesome” sitcom fare? Family Guy was already doing that; that is the premise of the show. Are they satires of the whole notion of PTSD or victim psychology? I don’t think even this show’s writers are quite that ghoulish. I think they’re not satires at all. I think they’re cheap, flat gags that fill time but mostly exist for their own sake, jokes that exist to prove that you can put something reprehensible on television and that doing so is worth it for its own sake. I have yet to see this argument convincingly articulated.

    My pet theory is that the show’s new, nastier direction was at least in part due to its syndication on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim. A mix of robust DVD sales and phenomenal ratings on its new program block led to the show’s resuscitation on FOX after being cancelled by that network; and this happened at a time when a) Family Guy’s continued success was by no means a guaranteed prospect, and b)Adult Swim’s own slate was moving away from bouncy stoner shows and towards a darker kind of psychedelia, from Metalocalypse’s muted hues and perpetual ultraviolence to Squidbillies’ surreal sadism and nearly apocalyptic portrayal of an impoverished, kaleidoscopic Georgia landscape. It doesn’t seem farfetched that the producers might want to make adjustments to Family Guy’s tone in order for it to fit in better with the rest of Adult Swim’s programming, should it have become the show’s permanent home.

    Whatever the whys and wherefores, the changes stuck, and we’re now living in an era where a primetime show on a core network can feature a minutes-long skit about its central character trying to silently scoop the festooned organs of a beached whale back inside of its carcass with a forklift. Oh brave new world, etc. etc.

    It’s not as though they didn’t try to right the ship at certain points. After the show lost its original spark of novelty but before its writers became utterly complacent, there was a mid-period of Family Guy in which the program became restless and eager to shake things up. This time from around 2007 to 2010 produced the most creatively risky episodes in the show’s history. “Road to the Multiverse,” a yarn in which Stewie and Brian traipse through parallel universes in an attempt to return to their own, showcases some of the most sophisticated animation the show has ever attempted and set a template for time travel/parallel reality exploration stories with the duo that remain some of the most entertaining episodes of the show’s latter years. This era also produced “And Then There Were Fewer,” a double episode in the style of Clue wherein, for the first time, cutaway gags were abandoned entirely and several supporting characters were killed off and stayed dead permanently.

    Special note must also be given to “Brian & Stewie,” an episode in which the titular characters become trapped in a bank vault over the weekend. Not only are there no cutaway gags, but it is also the first episode without any soundtrack whatsoever, and in fact Brian and Stewie are the only two characters that appear during the episode’s whole runtime. There are still jokes and gross-out gags but these are largely sidelined for dialogues exploring the duo’s resentments and insecurities. Considering McFarlane himself voices both characters, the episode comes across like a man talking to himself in an empty room, working out his purpose in life all by himself yet simultaneously broadcasting his deepest fears in front of a millionfold audience. Minimal and intimate, nothing like it happened on Family Guy before or since, and I can think of few television episodes much like it in any genre (Breaking Bad’s celebrated “Fly” one-off is the only thing that comes to mind).

    Yet even amongst these flashes of ingenuity, mediocrity still ruled the day. Whether it was an episode about Brian practicing MRA tactics to date Cheryl Tiegs, a parody of Spies Like Us guest-starring the audibly bored Chevy Chase and Dan Akroyd reprising their roles from that film, or its bombardment of intermittently amusing but far-too-long Star Wars reenactments, Family Guy had lost its magic touch for pop culture pastiche. Bogged down with guest stars and homages irrelevant to anyone under 35, it doubled down on its vulgarity to fill the gaps. And when the writers eventually gave up their aforementioned experiments entirely, this formula became all that was left: tired pop culture references, strained obscenity, and a dwindling audience compelled to keep watching out of nothing but Stockholm Syndrome.

    The latest season of Family Guy includes an episode which attempts to comment on the police brutality crisis sweeping the American consciousness. This sentence may come across as redundant, but it’s a fucking disaster. Peter shoots Cleveland Jr., the son of his black neighbor Cleveland, thinking he was attempting to break into the house. Cleveland labels Peter a racist, and he ends up in jail for a separate but related crime. Somehow his defense uses this as an excuse to exonerate him for shooting Cleveland Jr. (?) by portraying the boy in court as a violent thug, to which Peter objects. The episode ends with a clean slate, as always, insisting that Cleveland overreacted to Peter shooting his son (!) but also positing that racial stereotyping is never acceptable.

    What a toothless, mewling thing Family Guy has become: a show that built its reputation on “edge” that doesn’t even have the gumption to take a concrete stance on the racist slaughter of black Americans for fear of alienating its viewers. Charmless, meaningless and untethered from any innate sense of responsibility, Family Guy has become the Andrew Dice Clay of its era: very occasionally showing flashes of brilliance that are suffocated by laziness and entitlement, an inexplicably popular totem that has become less culturally relevant than yesterday’s Gawker gossip item.

    Only things that were once good can have the chance to age badly; Family Guy modeled itself after entertainment icons that folded up and faded away with their era. And if this is indeed the era of Family Guy, it’s hard to fathom who will mourn its passing.
    Last edited by Draft; 10-18-2017 at 09:26 AM.

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  14. #5172


    That article was depressing to read. And 100% factual.

    I still think that Family Guy could have reached Simpsons/South Park status (in terms of critical acclaim, not popularity) if they had never been cancelled, or tried finding a similar writing staff to the original team when they were revived. The old writers went to American Dad, and the new writers didn't even understand what made the show great or gave it a cult following in the first place. In the early years, the show wanted to be like The Simpsons and tried working at it. Nowadays, the show hates itself and understands why it doesn't get respect like The Simpsons, but refuses to change anything about itself to earn that respect.

    Getting cancelled twice was simultaneously the best and worst thing that could have happened to the show.
    Last edited by Dr. Nihilistic; 10-19-2017 at 05:34 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Nihilistic View Post
    That article was depressing to read. And 100% factual.

    I still think that Family Guy could have reached Simpsons/South Park status (in terms of critical acclaim, not popularity) if they had never been cancelled, or tried finding a similar writing staff to the original team when they were revived. The old writers went to American Dad, and the new writers didn't even understand what made the show great or gave it a cult following in the first place. In the early years, the show wanted to be like The Simpsons and tried working at it. Nowadays, the show hates itself and understands why it doesn't get respect like The Simpsons, but refuses to change anything about itself to earn that respect.

    Getting cancelled twice was simultaneously the best and worst thing that could have happened to the show.
    Totally agree, and I think you raise a good point about the cancellation. I don't if I'm reaching too much, but I always got the impression FOX attempted to somewhat sabotage Family Guy and Futurama during their first runs. They put them in bad schedules (and both ended up cancelled) and IIRC didn't even bother to update the sites of the shows. The result is that when they returned elsewhere, both became worse than their original (although Futurama was still consistently good with some bad episodes, whereas FG completely betrayed what their characters stood for and even the tone of the show). You could notice the Flanderization taking over, and the shock humor increasing (see the first three seasons or season 4's gore, then see the newest season - which has gore at any given opportunity). Satire was abandoned to make lame jokes about a myriad of topics which the writers don't know how to satirize.

    I remember a PhantomStrider video in which he said the "Road to..." or the episodes focusing on Brian and Stewie are both great and depressing at the same time because it showcases the former brilliance of the show and even show the writers can write and produce great episodes. Not just their duo episodes, but episodeslike And Then There Were Fewer, PTV, Petarded, which shows they can satirize society, they just don't want to for some reason, and like you mentioned, they know this, but they don't want to do anything to better the show. I think if Seth continued to write for the show it would at least stay closer to his original ideas and vision. Another thing I really miss is how the family was a family. Now the characters just seem to be a lot of strangers thrown together into a house.

    Not going to lie, the only thing that keeps me watching the show is Stewie, and Brian (only when he's with Stewie because alone he's insufferable now). Stewie is the only good character now imo and while I miss his evil genius persona, I think he's still very interesting (when the writers don't use him to make unfunny gay jokes). He basically carries the "plot" of the modern episodes.


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    SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12

    [EDITOR'S NOTE 1: Audio descriptions for tonight's episodes of THE SIMPSONS, GHOSTED, FAMILY GUY and THE LAST MAN ON EARTH are available on the SAP Audio Channel.]

    [EDITOR'S NOTE 2: BOB'S BURGERS is preempted tonight.]

    "FAMILY GUY" - (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) CC-AD-HDTV 720p-Dolby Digital 5.1

    BRIAN GETS KICKED OUT OF THE GRIFFIN HOUSE ON AN ALL-NEW "FAMILY GUY" SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12, ON FOX

    When Brian posts an offensive tweet that goes viral and the rest of the Griffins are also treated as outcasts, he's forced to move out of the Griffin house in the all-new "The D in Apartment 23" episode of FAMILY GUY airing Sunday, Nov. 12 (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (FG-1503) (TV-14 D, L, S, V)

    Voice Cast: Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Brian Griffin, Quagmire, and Tom Tucker; Alex Borstein as Lois Griffin; Seth Green as Chris Griffin; Mila Kunis as Meg; Mike Henry as Cleveland Brown; and Patrick Warburton as Joe.

    This is interesting. The plot might end up being a lot like the beginning of The Simpsons Guy, but I wonder how the writers will handle this. Judging from that title, The Griffins will end up at an apartment.

  18. #5175
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    isn't this the start to a 3-part story arc that they mentioned, or am i thinking about something else entirely?

  19. #5176
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    @Wail-id, Nope, you're correct about this being the first episode in the three parter that was announced earlier this year. I'm also sure that this episode will be the one with the lunchroom brawl scene from the Comic-Con trailer.

    I personally don't think this idea has enough story to justify it being more than a single episode, but I hope they'll at least make all the episodes connect to one another unlike AD!'s Daesong Heavy Industries two-parter from last year.
    Last edited by John95; 10-19-2017 at 06:11 PM.

  20. #5177


    Nannys' Goat was BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAd!! ! There were other episodes about Peter and Lois'es marriage that were handled better. The ending was a cop out. It looked like they were finally settled things till they saw the rest of the family but instead they laughed and said their weekend was terrible. That was a copout. The nanny plot helped a bit but not enough. Brian got shot and killed then he was back with no explanation was stupid the one I really hated was Meg and Chris almost kissing each other. Enough of the incest jokes!!!! Their not funny!!! I'm glad that Peter got slammed into the wall after he slammed Lois into the wall. The action scene with the nanny was good but not enough. A 2 for me.

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    @sideshow ken, I honestly thought the whole chase scene was stupid.

    I've already mentioned that the episode had a very post-Barker AD! feel to it in regards to what little fucks were given and that scene was no exception. The fact that it had random crap in it like Brian getting shot with it never being acknowledged later and Chris wearing a doctor's outfit for some reason as he and Meg are about to kiss doesn't help.

  22. #5179


    I also forgot to mentioned a couple of things. I didn't like when Peter cut Lois off when she was about to do the same joke as but he says only men can tell jokes like that. The second one was when Lois asked if Mort saw The Goldbergs because he was Jewish. Isn't she Jewish herself? The writers lost track of that. The former shows how sexist the writers are.

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    @sideshow ken, Ironically I actually liked Peter cutting her off because when she started I went "Oh god, don't do the same exact goddamn drawn-out joke all over again!"

    Though I agree that the "Have you seen...?" bit was terrible as were both of Peter's breathing gags (especially the window one).

  24. #5181
    Wrote the book on flimflammin Grifty McGrift's Avatar
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    Peter exhaling was one of the best gags of the episode
    Last edited by Grifty McGrift; 10-21-2017 at 11:31 AM.

  25. #5182


    Quote Originally Posted by sideshow ken View Post
    The former shows how sexist the writers are.
    Isn't that a satire as to how some men perceive women or treat them though? I mean, I don't get people saying this is sexist. Like that time when Lois said women can't sexually harass men, or when Brian said God's not real because Meg is ugly. It's obvious satire and absurdism. Why when South Park does something like that it's genius but when FG does this too it's dumb and bad writing. Yeah, some shit is bad (like Meg's abuse, Joe's abuse, or Peter throwing Lois to the wall in last episode), but I hear people complain about genuine things that are meant to be absurd. Brian isn't the voice reason (not anymore), but his fakeness is played for laughs to show how ridiculous he is, not because the writers think he is right.

    I agree FG can be sexist sometimes. But many times, it's for satire, and Seth himself is a huge advocate of women's right, gay's right, and is progressive himself. Attributing satire to the writers and Seth being sexist, bigoted, not PC, and just enjoy shock value is like saying Matt Stone and Trey Parker believe in all of the bad stuff the characters do in SP. But no one tells that. And Matt and Trey genuinely put their opinions on episodes, insulting people all the way as you can see on all of their interviews, when never once I saw Seth saying he agrees with something Peter does or being mean to others (aside from that Quagmire/Marge thing years ago which he admitted was stupid).

    But no, Cartman is a genius satire on the dark nature of people, and Peter is shock value and unfunny.

    Not saying I defend Peter, but nowadays people just love to hate on FG. I too hate what the show became, but I know it was once good and has great episodes. On the internet you just see people saying it was always horrible and idiotic just because it's a different kind of humor or for the aforementioned points. Matt and Trey bashed FG back in the day just because the humor was not like theirs. Who are they to say only their humor is the good humor? Or how society is just good the way they want it to be?

    Sorry for the rant, but I wanted to say this somewhere.

  26. #5183
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    SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19

    [EDITOR'S NOTE: Audio descriptions for tonight's episodes of BOB'S BURGERS, THE SIMPSONS, GHOSTED, FAMILY GUY and THE LAST MAN ON EARTH are available on the SAP Audio Channel.]

    "FAMILY GUY" - (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) CC-AD-HDTV 720p-Dolby Digital 5.1

    VLADIMIR PUTIN VISITS QUAHOG ON AN ALL-NEW "FAMILY GUY" SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19, ON FOX

    Kristen Bell ("A Bad Moms Christmas"), Emmy Award-Winning Reality Host Jeff Probst ("Survivor") and Iwan Rheon ("Inhumans," "Game of Thrones") Guest-Voice

    On Thanksgiving weekend, Peter discovers an alternate ending in the Russian version of one of his favorite films and writes to Vladimir Putin, who comes to Quahog. Meanwhile, a strapped-for-cash Brian gets a job at a suicide hotline center and attempts to strike up a romance with a co-worker (guest voice Kristen Bell) in the all-new "Petey IV" episode of FAMILY GUY airing Sunday, Nov. 19 (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (FG-1504) (TV-14 D, L, S, V)

    Voice Cast: Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Brian Griffin, Quagmire, and Tom Tucker; Alex Borstein as Lois Griffin; Seth Green as Chris Griffin; Mila Kunis as Meg; Mike Henry as Cleveland Brown; and Patrick Warburton as Joe.

    Guest Voice Cast: Kristen Bell as Martha; Iwan Rheon as George, John, and Ring Announcer; and Jeff Probst as Jeff Probst

    I really don't know what to except. this is barely the 4th episode of the new showrunner's tenure and I got a feeling he might not do the show justice if we're going to keep having inadequate plots like Nanny Goats. I'm mixed on the episode itself, both plots. When are we having the next Brian and Stewie episode?

  27. #5184
    Pin Pal John95's Avatar
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    @fas1997, the upcoming Dog Bites Bear is a Brian & Stewie episode. It was originally listed on the Wiki to tentatively air on January 7th, but is currently listed as TBA.

  28. #5185
    The Blue Files OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    I like how they for Kristen Bell list a movie which hasn't come out yet.
    Quote Originally Posted by scully apologist;bt39949
    "KONY 2012"

  29. #5186


    Quote Originally Posted by fas1997 View Post
    SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19

    [EDITOR'S NOTE: Audio descriptions for tonight's episodes of BOB'S BURGERS, THE SIMPSONS, GHOSTED, FAMILY GUY and THE LAST MAN ON EARTH are available on the SAP Audio Channel.]

    "FAMILY GUY" - (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) CC-AD-HDTV 720p-Dolby Digital 5.1

    VLADIMIR PUTIN VISITS QUAHOG ON AN ALL-NEW "FAMILY GUY" SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19, ON FOX

    Kristen Bell ("A Bad Moms Christmas"), Emmy Award-Winning Reality Host Jeff Probst ("Survivor") and Iwan Rheon ("Inhumans," "Game of Thrones") Guest-Voice

    On Thanksgiving weekend, Peter discovers an alternate ending in the Russian version of one of his favorite films and writes to Vladimir Putin, who comes to Quahog. Meanwhile, a strapped-for-cash Brian gets a job at a suicide hotline center and attempts to strike up a romance with a co-worker (guest voice Kristen Bell) in the all-new "Petey IV" episode of FAMILY GUY airing Sunday, Nov. 19 (9:00-9:30 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (FG-1504) (TV-14 D, L, S, V)

    Voice Cast: Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Brian Griffin, Quagmire, and Tom Tucker; Alex Borstein as Lois Griffin; Seth Green as Chris Griffin; Mila Kunis as Meg; Mike Henry as Cleveland Brown; and Patrick Warburton as Joe.

    Guest Voice Cast: Kristen Bell as Martha; Iwan Rheon as George, John, and Ring Announcer; and Jeff Probst as Jeff Probst

    I really don't know what to except. this is barely the 4th episode of the new showrunner's tenure and I got a feeling he might not do the show justice if we're going to keep having inadequate plots like Nanny Goats. I'm mixed on the episode itself, both plots. When are we having the next Brian and Stewie episode?
    You think Sulkin hasn't been doing good? This season has been one of the best in a while, and is a nice return to the older seasons' formulas with the characters likable again. Plus it seems they reduced the cutaways, gross jokes and Meg and Joe abuse, which is very good, since those were what kept the quality of the show so low IMO.

  30. #5187


    Quote Originally Posted by Draft View Post
    You think Sulkin hasn't been doing good? This season has been one of the best in a while, and is a nice return to the older seasons' formulas with the characters likable again. Plus it seems they reduced the cutaways, gross jokes and Meg and Joe abuse, which is very good, since those were what kept the quality of the show so low IMO.
    I hope they continue this way because it has that feeling of the first 3 years and that 's great.

  31. #5188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draft View Post
    You think Sulkin hasn't been doing good? This season has been one of the best in a while, and is a nice return to the older seasons' formulas with the characters likable again. Plus it seems they reduced the cutaways, gross jokes and Meg and Joe abuse, which is very good, since those were what kept the quality of the show so low IMO.
    I'm not saying his showran episodes are going to suck, but the show just need more original plots, that's all. Still keeping my hopes up even if some episodes will manage to disappoint me.

    For now, judging from the future episode titles like Crimes and Meg's Demeanor, V is for Mystery, Brian Dates a Bitch, and Family Guy Through the Years sound like they're goingto be good, if the effort is actually put in, not phoned it in like in some seasons.

  32. #5189
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    http://ew.com/tv/2017/11/03/family-g...st-episodes/2/

    An article on the future of Carrie Fisher's character.

  33. #5190


    I can't wait for her last episode in December. she will be missed.



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