View Poll Results: RATE AND REVIEW THE SIMPSONS MOVIE!!

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  • 5 STARS - WOO-HOO! Completely worth the 18 year wait!

    331 32.14%
  • 4.5 STARS - Fantastic

    201 19.51%
  • 4 STARS - Excellent

    173 16.80%
  • 3.5 STARS - Really good

    95 9.22%
  • 3 STARS - It was pretty good, but could have been better

    121 11.75%
  • 2.5 STARS - Hmmm... good, I guess

    35 3.40%
  • 2 STARS - Meh, I dunno, not entirely what I wanted

    26 2.52%
  • 1.5 STARS - Not too good

    13 1.26%
  • 1 STAR - Groan, that was pretty bad

    12 1.17%
  • 0.5 STARS - Not worth the wait at all, wish it was never made

    7 0.68%
  • 0 STARS - The worst moment in Simpsons history

    16 1.55%
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Thread: Rate & Review: THE SIMPSONS MOVIE



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  1. #391
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    It was far from my expectations but it wasnt as craptacular as I feared it would be.


    Good Points:

    Lisa dicking about with the lift

    Homer and Bart jumping the gorge (nostalga alart!)

    Random Irish Kid witing the song on the dome

    President Swartzwelder choosing the options and being manipulated by Russ Cargill

    Clap for Alaska

    Marge's tape/wedding video

    Bad Points

    Lisa punching Bart in the face

    OMG ITS BARTS PENIS LOL!!!!!!

    The underdevelopment of the Random Irish Kid's character, his only moments that I liked was the song writing and 'My dad's not Bono!'

  2. #392
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    It wasn't as great as people really think, but it isn't as bad as I was expecting. For me, it's around Season 8 quality (season 8 is my third favorite season). The animation was wonderful, and I loved nearly everything to do with the pig...the Alaska scene was also great (except I'm not sure what exactly to think of the stuff with the 'boob lady'). Green Day's part was stupid, in fact I disliked almost everything in the first 20 minutes (as well as Lisa's subplot with Colin, that seemed to have no real meaning to it). I liked Tom Hanks' cameo, the voice acting was wonderful (Julie's reading of Marge on the video tape is the best thing to to come from the cast, ever). I loved the thing with the dome, especially the shot of the town in ruins at dusk (I think it's near the part at Burns' mansion, but can't fully remember). My favorite scenes were the one with the animals helping Marge and Homer get to bed (especially when they slowly begin to look horrified), and when Bart modifies the Wanted poster, only for people that look like the modifications to turn up. Oh, and the thing with Bart's penis was stupid and wasn't needed at all.
    I stayed almost until the end of the credits (saw the 'sequel' part), but ended up leaving before the SVT bit because people came in to clean up before the next showing.

    B+

    Oh, and loved the cries of "what the hell" and "you can't be serious" that came from the audience when it said "To be continued"...one guy actually got up and went to leave...idiot.
    Last edited by Zeus; Today at 12:00 PM. Reason: to fuck with you

  3. #393


    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Scully
    FLANDERS: Uh, excuse me, I'd like to hear from Channel Surfer...
    Heh, I've been meaning to comment on the movie. Problem though is that between the 14 pages of comments here and the additional comments in the AV thread, there really isn't too much I can add that I feel is substantial. Guess I can stick to general personal impressions though.

    The best I can say about the film is that, removed from the context of the best of the show's legacy, it is simply OK. There's a number of working jokes here and there, and even most of the jokes that don't work don't linger in such a way that I'm left wondering how they could slip by even the most lax quality control check out there. A popcorn muncher really, with occasional flashes of brilliance and a fast enough pace/short enough time frame that it never becomes boring.

    That's really about the best I can say though.

    In the context of the best of the series, it seems far too content in reliving the past, freely lifting jokes, scenes, and even whole plot ideas from the past episodes (and often not redoing them as well either), with whatever left over feeling either half-assed, underdeveloped, or predictable in its own right. Just from memory, there's the opening shot of Homer pointing at the screen as if he's talking to us akin to "Who Shot Mr. Burns", the cryptic mad religious prophecy spelling out the apocalypse much like "Thank God It's Doomsday", Krusty faking that he likes Krusty Burger food but immediately spitting it out off camera like "Lisa's First Word", the FOX ad in the movie might as well have been from "Mr. Spritz Goes to Washington", the Plopper plot with Homer taking care of the pig felt like a weird mix of the "Girly Edition" and "Lisa Gets an A" subplots, and the fake Simpsons family that gets arrested like Guy Incognito in "Fear of Flying". This isn't even counting things that are clearly meant to be appreciated in tribute like the Jebus mention, jumping the gorge yet again, another mutated multi-eye creature thing, or Maggie speaking. Nor is this counting jokes or plotlines that only vaguely resemble past episodes either like Homer's new spiritual journey, Lisa having yet another crush, another marriage crisis plot, or the Simpsons are going to Alaska plot point. With so much that's deja vu, much of what used to be or could have been enjoyable had it never been done before just felt tired or easy, no matter what reason it was put in for.

    This could be ignored maybe if what was original was better, but too often it felt like it took the easy road here too. The film felt like it was aspiring to what the show is most famous for, the prominent role of religion in the Simpsons' lives, the strong political-environmental tone of the film, subversive government bashing, and that no matter what happens the strength of the Simpson nuclear family holding strong against all forces. But again, compared to what the show has done in the past, it felt cartoonish and simplistic. Cargill's evil almost for the sake of evil power madness in his desire to destroy Springfield puts the movie closer to a generic action film/thriller like "Outbreak" or something, and like JM1878 mentioned it doesn't even attempt to subvert its clear action movie silliness on even a "King Sized Homer" level. Nor does it help that, despite some still wonderfully fun and well-performed scenes (the mad with power line, the various numbered plan sequences), the Al. Brooks character still feels like a Hank Scorpio lite, having a similar clipped, speedy speaking style and evil mastermind aspirations but lacking a clear or biting satirical purpose. In regards to any environmental themes, the polluted lake barely rises above a plot point, with anything else notable being left at a casual one-liner (the line about Alaska ruining its beauty for oil, the idea of naming the head of the EPA after Cargill Corporation given their environmental controversies as a business). And I'll grant that with the Homer and Marge marriage stuff the video scene has enough weight and sincerity to it to almost make me forget that the marriage crisis plot has been played to death. But even so, it's undermined quickly with a quick audience fake-out and a bear attack. So it's hard to tell just how serious they really wanted us to take this plot anyway.

    An absurd amount of slapstick, Homer-in-pain gags, and a frequently loud, domineering, and encroaching Homer characterization in particular also have whiffs of Scully all over the film too. Granted much of it doesn't have the same kind of banality or excess of his stuff. Some of it actually works at least to a degree, and there's still more of an element of consequence and humanity to Homer here than Scully usually displayed. That said, like Jimbo already detailed, all the weird tendencies that define Homer during Scully define him here too, which hurts the film to a significant degree given he has the most screen time.

    I could go on, but I think my point is largely made. The movie is not the kind of groundbreaking, insightful, original stalwart of comedy that defined the show during its prime. It understands what made the show the pioneering force it was, but too frequently on anything satirical it takes the easy way out with cartoonish antics without much point, and plays too frequently in tribute to itself or easy slapstick humor. Not all of which is unenjoyable granted, but I do not think it does justice to what I think made the show great and appealing in the first place. And, because of that, it is unfortunately a disappointment, even if I don't think it's a bad film.

  4. #394
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    I finally saw it, and it was quite underwhelming. All smiles and zero laughs. It just went from decent to worse to better. The good: a few working jokes (bar patrons and churchgoers being the primary example) and the excellent animation. As for everything else, it wasn't so good. A ton of the jokes were bad (the wanted poster gag was terribly predictable; no idea why people have been gushing over it) and I felt the plot went for too much of an epic scope. As for the 'emotional' moments, I'm sorry, but I just didn't think the wedding video was very good at all, and everyone knows how much I love emotional 'Simpsons' moments. It felt like a typical attempt at a tear-jerker that failed because it was simply Marge getting mad at Homer like we've seen a bajillion times, but only this time played for to be sad and emotional so that we overlook the fact that it's been done so many times before. As I speculated, the most interesting and, in my opinion, genuinely emotional part of the film was the Bart/Flanders relationship. It got off to a good start, but unfortunately it fizzled out quickly and was resolved far too easily. So even that didn't work too well. The Lisa romance should have been scrapped and the never-ending slapstick was horrible. The worst part was, walking out, I felt more like 'well, I saw the Simpsons Movie, now that's out of the way' than 'Awesome! I just saw the Simpsons Movie!'. Despite my complaints, it was definitely an enjoyable film. There were just the right amount of decent jokes to make it a fairly good comedy, and the animation, as I already said, was spectacular.

    So a 3/5.

  5. #395


    I watched the movie too, and I have to say that I don't have original stuff to say here.

    I think the movie was packed with a number of more or less brilliant sequences and very good gags/jokes (which I liked pretty much), so I can see why many people overlooked the fact that the story (or the stories) was half-assed. Unfortunately the movie seemed to me a sequence of well-done scenes with a less thoughtful plot connecting them. Lisa's story in particular didn't integrate really well with the others.

    The best sequence to me was the Bart skateboarding one, I wasn't bothered to see his privates, they were well drawn IMO.
    The worst scenes to me were the whole Homer's epiphany (which my girlfriend fell asleep watching, and I couldn't really blame on her for that) that I found meaningless (or trivial in its content, if you want) and unnecessary, and the over-the-top Hollywoodian action movie motorcycle sequence at the end which I felt really as a lazy way to resolve the story.

    For the rest I basically agree with many people posting in the past pages, and with Channel Surfer and TheForbiddenDonut above here. Anyway in my opinion the biggest flaw of the movie was that it failed to tell a cohesive, meaningful, deep story rather then failing at satirical points.

    I noticed how much inspiration the writers took from the TV series and practically every scene of the movie reminded to me a similar scene in the history of the show. I also think they took inspiration from the South Park movie, except the fact that the South Park movie was awesome.

    Personally, this movie proved to me how much unimportant Homer Simpson is in my life nowadays. If they don't manage to give more depth to the characters and more meaning to the stories the show is gonna lose much of the relevance it still has to me. 3/5 (B-/C+)

  6. #396
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheForbiddenDonut
    The worst part was, walking out, I felt more like 'well, I saw the Simpsons Movie, now that's out of the way' than 'Awesome! I just saw the Simpsons Movie!'.
    I kinda felt a little like that too which I also found sad. But I was very entertained and laughing during the whole thing, I got this feeling once the credits appeared (right before the jokes in the credits). I'm glad you still wrote your reviews cause I think the last three are very constructive and the kind of review the staff should read.

    I also felt that the three subplots involving Lisa, Flanders/Bart and Plopper were a little underveloped. The sad part is that, unlike some of the weaker modern episodes, what was actually left in those plots was fairly good. I realize there is some difficulties in developing four subplots in a movie, but then again SP movie did it so well and there were enough dispensable scenes in The Simpsons Movie. I loved Lisa's introduction (and when she talked to Marge Lisa was very charming and cute "He's not imaginary!") but her role in the movie was never substantial and her plot wasn't anything but a series of jokes. Good jokes for the most part, but zero development.

    I didn't care that much about the Plopper stuff and I could have even done without it (yeah, I won't have even cared if they have dropped the whole Spiderpig thing) but once you have it I will have liked it to have an end. I liked Plopper more than Mojo or Pinchy, it's just that it has never been my favourite Homer subplot. But I think Pinchy's subplot was a little funnier and more cohesive.
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  7. #397
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    I loved it!!! Some parts made me wanna cry, like when they left homer in alaska, that was sad . But other than that, that will forever be my favorite movie. Except one thing:
    When i first heard Green Day was gonna be in it, i was like, OMG!! My 2 favorite things are comming together at last!! And when I saw it in theaters i cheered when they came on srceen, i couldn't help it. But what happened to them dissapointed me!! :-O WHY WRITERS, WHY!!!!???? But It made me laugh, too i guess. And writers, i like the American Idiot: funeral version, lmao dude!!! Overall, this movie rocks!!! It was definitly worth the wait!

  8. #398
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    Okay heres my R&R.

    Now it started with an itchy and scratchy which was good but imo could have done with some blood! And Gore. Funny enough to make up for it though, itchy being president and the whole itchy/hilary clinton was a laugh. Then the family being in the cinema was a good way to kick off the movie but i found homers line annoyingly forced. Great opening sequence which as far as i can rember features the two characters who could have definmately done with bigger roles, or at least more lines in Apu's case, in the movie: Apu as previously mentioned and Mr. Burns, good simple gags though.

    Okay so now the Green Day concert. Not a big fan or green day, in fcat you could even go as far as to say i hate them. Luckily they hadn't a cringeworthy part in the movie. Well the ball in the drummers balls slightly crimgeworthy. Got big luaghs from the dumber audience. Now heres the point i should probably mention that i saw the movie twice, once with a good audience of fairly intelligent adults, and another of annoying children and there equally annoying parents (unintentionally of course). Inthe latter audience there was a weary parent who was repeatedly exclaming "Oh gawd" at moments in the film such as the cocoa gag among many, many others. Of course the kids laughed at such jokes as i"i'll show the world homer simspsons got cahoneys" and the like. Back to the point. Now we have some good jokes here, edna with a shirt saying "not my husband" in it (is it me or were enda krabapples breasts much larger than usual in that instance. Just an observation...) Fairly funny but nothing spectacular here, as well as the CBG (the first of many appearences in the movie, all good), funny enough but again nothing too special. At this point the enviroment theme begins to grow, developing with Lisa meeting colin who imo was a great addition to the movie with a great joke about bono. Church now. The way grampa had a senile freakout was interesing shall we say, but not the bet way that this could have been done, i think originally god was meant to speak to them as seen in animatic with the season 9 dvd. More CBG, no speakin but funny facial expression. Grampa is shown as more senile in the film which is a change from thye show where, although still senile (but to an extent) is a bit more of a crotchety old man. Even more CBG, a replacement to the "heres the money shot" reverend lovejoy scene seen in one of the trailers. This edit i don't mind, although reverend lovejoy would have probably made more sense.

    We've got some decent homer and bart stuff at this point, at a definate high point of the movie. we have the dares and of course the long speculated barts penis shot. Well done if you ask me. Originally i thought the chip would fall out of flanders hand, and i was thinking were would be the comedy in that, it would be just for shock value. But although being done mainly for shock value was actually laugh out loud funny too. Oh now we meet spider-pig/harry plopper. i luaghed the most at this joke in the movie although it was not neccaseraly the funniest moment: Homer Imagining what fun he ould have with the pig. And "you can't kill him if he's wearing people clothes!". Ploppers facial expressions were hilarious throughout.

    Review to be continued....

    immediately.

    Homer dumps the pig shite in the lake because of a donut sale featuring a good chief wiggum joke and something evil happens. We get a good joke here where Homer gets in the back of the car and says to the pig "Drive!" then realises his error and hops in the front, personally i think this joke would have been funnier if homer had noticed his error and it just cut away from that scene before he got in the front to get on with what was happening elsewhere. Could have saved time for some promising scenes that were deleted.

    Homer gets busted for polluting the lake after a big dome is put over springfield by Russ Cargil: a downright hilarious new character played by the brilliant Al Brooks of course. One mediocre joke comes here were Cargil tells the springfieldians that they're "trapped like carrots", other than that his lines are classic with his rant about tough and soft soldiers and the numbered plots with president arnie. So a big crowd chases homer and they get captured. It seems they want to just kill homer (which even that is bit odd since usually they would just form an angry mob outside his house and shout at him for doing worse things that that rather than actually murder him) when they set out nooses for all 5 simpsons anyway. Even Maggie which was a pretty dark joke. They escape through maggies sinkhole and get out of the dome homer gets stuck and puts his middle fingers up, a horribly cringeworthy joke among very few. Colin again, sweet joke here followed by Lisa punching bart in the face which i liked alot as it isn't something lisa would usually do and some would argue out of character but i disagree. Lisa had perfectly good reason.

    To alaska! (after some bart drunkenness and kissing police in a motel) At this point i fell the movie slows down and drifts along as if everything else is forgotten about springfeild until of course Tom Hanks tells them that it's gonna be blown up. A suprisingly good guest appearence for a seemingly last minutue thing. Homer refuses to save springfeld and marge leaves him we get some great voice acting from marge and some pretty strong emotion too with it. The same weary woman who didn't know when to laugh let out a murmer of fake laughter during marges tape. I think she felt pressured to laugh, and just had to go becuase here kids were there tyhough had never watched the simpsons fully in her life

    review TBC
    Last edited by chocolatey socrates; 08-15-2007 at 12:45 PM.

  9. #399
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    The grammar, spelling and composition of those last two review gave me a head ache and I didn't even read them entirely.
    "There's nothing worse than some idiot telling you how funny a joke is before you get a chance to see it in its natural habitat."

  10. #400
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Grubermeister
    Well the ball in the drummers balls slightly crimgeworthy. Got big luaghs from the dumber audience.
    Not an attack on Grubermeister, but just something I've seen in a few places here (and I'm sure a bunch of times in this thread) that kinda annoys me: what's so bad about cheap gags like that, and acting condescending, calling them the "dumber" audience whilst you say it was awful? I mean, I thought the film was well-rounded in cheap laughs like that and slightly more intelligent gags (well... not quite well-rounded, there was definitely way too much slapstick and Homer in pain gags, but whatever. All types of jokes were present) and that leaves something for everyone. Yes, we all love intelligent jokes, but something like a rock in the balls can still be funny, depending on how it plays out (and at the very least it was nice and quick). Yeah, it's a joke anyone can do and whatever, but really... so? (EDIT to clarify in advance: I don't have a problem with not liking a joke, but I do have a problem with acting condescending towards said joke.)

    ... Eh, sorry. But while I'm still here, I'd definitely change my vote down to a 4.5/5. I still really love the movie, but as has been said, there's too many loose ends and it is a little overplayed. Still had a great time each time I went out and saw it, though, since characterizations were in top form, etc etc, I'm just gonna be repeating myself here. But yeah... 5/5 is a bit much, after calming down from the hype. Still a good movie in its own right.
    Last edited by arii; 08-14-2007 at 04:32 PM.

  11. #401
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceiwynd
    Not an attack on Grubermeister, but just something I've seen in a few places here (and I'm sure a bunch of times in this thread) that kinda annoys me: what's so bad about cheap gags like that, and acting condescending, calling them the "dumber" audience whilst you say it was awful?
    Because jokes like that are something the show used to make fun of.

  12. #402
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobservo
    Because jokes like that are something the show used to make fun of.
    And perform themselves. Not necessarily duplicates, but along the same vein. I still can't see the harm, though.

    Regardless, times and tastes do change and the show does take note of that and adapt itself in at least some way.

  13. #403
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    If you're arguing that "empty pain gags + cloying sentimentality" is a formula that has just come into vogue, I would counter that shows like "Home Improvement" did that every week 15 years ago, back when "The Simpsons" was making fun of shows like that for precisely that reason.

    But if you're arguing that irony and intelligent social commentary are passe ideas that the show should be trying to distance itself from, I ... well, that I don't understand. Nostalgia is attractive to every generation, but the events of the last decade cry out -- more, I think, than any comparable stretch of time in recent memory -- for the kind of savage honesty that used to define "The Simpsons". In contrast, we have no shortage of guys getting hit in the balls.

  14. #404
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    I don't think I was arguing either of those. (Keep in mind that The Simpsons did do some empty pain gags back in the early years, too.) And... I definitely would not be arguing that the show wants to distance itself from more intelligent material. I think it wants both, and I would prefer it had more intelligent than cheap gags (and that doesn't mean I want the cheap ones to completely disappear... one style of joke for an entire movie, or even episode, would get pretty grating), though the cheap outweighed the intelligent in the movie.

    All I'm saying is I don't like the condescending attitude towards some jokes, to the point where you feel you're above the rest of the audience. Sorry for the lack of clarity - in my edit I probably should've gotten rid of the rambling paragraph and simply gone with the edit I made.

  15. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by Channel Surfer
    the FOX ad in the movie might as well have been from "Mr. Spritz Goes to Washington"...and the fake Simpsons family that gets arrested like Guy Incognito in "Fear of Flying".
    Those are a stretch, IMO. Especially the Fox ad, which I found very original. How about the To Be Continued gag? I enjoyed it, but it screamed "Wiggum P.I." to me.

  16. #406


    I didn't read the previous pages really carefully, but I'd like to comment 'The family leaves Homer in Alaska' plot point. I don't think we were supposed to feel so sad in that moment, or at least I didn't. In the scene where the family watches the TV and learns that Springfield would be destroyed, Homer was really selfish and uncaring, causing the following plot point as a logical consequence.

    He may have had good reasons for not willing to go back to help Springfield, but after all, those people were gonna die for something he was responsible for. And, as Bart correctly pointed out, in Springfield there were also people like Flanders, who risked his life to save them. And there was Colin, who was completely innocent and they were gonna die because of Homer's negligent behaviour.

    Worst of all, when the family asked to him to go back in Springfield he behaved like an asshole, and left home without giving any explanation. In that moment it was obvious for me that the family would have gone back trying to help Springfield, leaving Homer alone.
    What made me angry the most with him was the fact that he spent all the night at the bar drinking beer and playing videogames only with the purpose to get the family worried about him (like he said before coming back from the pub). He behaved like an egotistical, selfish bastard.

    So, being left alone was exactly what he deserved, he should have had seen it coming, to be honest.

    What I disliked the most of this plot point was the fact that right in the following scene Marge was already crying out of desperation and seemed already being meditating to come back to him. And immediately after they were trapped in the dome again, Marge said she missed Homer. Their conflict was already resolved before Homer had even did anything. So, what's the deal of putting such a conflict in the movie if they resolved it in such a simplistic way?
    The same can be said for the Homer/Bart conflict. After all the character development he had in the movie, questioning about looking for a better father figure, he regrets everything because Homer lets him to hold the bomb. That was really disappointing.

    It reminded me the way the family conflicts have been resolved in the last 5-6 years. No matter how badly Homer behaves, at some point the family members feel the need to forgive him and even apologize, even if Homer doesn't repair to his misbehaviour properly, if not at all. It's like if, for some reason, everyone owed something to him, something not justified. When the conflicts are resolved in that way, the characters feel silly and empty.

  17. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by luben
    The same can be said for the Homer/Bart conflict. After all the character development he had in the movie, questioning about looking for a better father figure, he regrets everything because Homer lets him to hold the bomb. That was really disappointing.
    To be honest, I consider Bart's sudden interest in Flanders to be strange and OOC for him. It's not consistent with all of the many years of abuse that he's just jumped back from time and time again. Homer has done FAR worse things to Bart than dare him to skateboard in the nude. ;-/ You could argue that the whole issue was poorly resolved, but, quite frankly, I don't think it ever really should have come up.

    Personally, I feel Bart in general was neutered in this film, which is a shame. His edge is gone, and he's become far too mellow. Lisa is a PC shadow of her former self, too idealistic and inhuman to be the original Lisa we saw back in season 3, who actually had a sense of humor and acted like an 8 year-old girl who just happened to be far smarter than the status quo would lead you to believe she should be. Making her into a vegetarian pretty much ruined her character, IMO. Besides that, however, I thought Homer was the best he's been in 10 years, and Julie's performance as Marge was incredible, especially in the goodbye tape. It sounded meditative, thoughtful, and incredibly sad. Best voice-acting she's pulled off in years. Maggie was also a winner.

    I saw this film for the second time today with a friend, and, while the "wow" factor was gone, I love it just the same. It's fantastic, layered, and amazingly funny. It really is like season 5 or 6 all over again. Screw the plot, I laughed at this film more than any other I've seen all year. My previous review stands.

  18. #408
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    Thing is though is I think its good once in a while to do something a little OOC, if that never happens a character does truly lose that feeling of being alive and they do become a paper cut out. I have to say I really disagree with some over this idea of Bart being too soft in the film. Even after watching it a second time a few weeks ago I think in the context of the film and the time that could be spared for the character he worked pretty well. I mean, if Bart never did anything but just be a bad boy and play pranks I can't help but feel like that would have been even more paper like and stale, hell thats been a lot of the problem with the character in the series in the first place.

    In the context of the film Bart just had a sudden relapse of judgement, he had to kind of pay for the consequences of his own actions and in doing that he wanted to converse with someone but Homer was too busy being a moron. To me it was just simply Bart growing up a little. Of course he never will and things'll just mostly go back to normal after this, but like said in the context of the film its him showing a little bit of "growing beyond" his childish ways. Like those guys who make asses of themselves as kids but then they just realize one day looking at themselves "god, is this what I am?".

    It was a nod to a really subtle part of the film, which was a lot of characters (even if its just hinted) going against their usual norm. Something I wish the film concentrated on more but regardless, I think Bart showing his sensitive side was a good thing. Yeah the conclusion was a bit anti-climactic obviously kinda there to just wrap the movie up quick but the rest of this stuff I think was there.

  19. #409
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    About a day after I saw the movie for the first time Boy-Scoutz N the Hood came on, and the Homer/Bart/Ned plots between the two are really, really similar. So I wouldn't say it was completely out of character for Bart - it's happened before. When you place Homer and Ned right next to each other in front of Bart, I guess it would depend how he feels at the moment, but Ned really does look better. In Boy-Scoutz, Homer has no idea what he's doing and he's an embarassement to Bart. Ned actually does know what he's doing, though, and when put in a life-threatening situation, he's the one you'd rather trust. In the movie, Homer had just let Bart get humiliated in front of the entire town and refused to take even a little bit of the blame for that - then it gets contrasted with Ned's helpfulness almost immediately, and surely that would make Bart think a bit. Ned's more reliable than Homer already.

    He didn't go straight to Flanders after that either, once again Flanders came to Bart. I mean, Bart was about to nail his father in the head - he was rightfully pretty ticked. Compare those feelings to Ned just out of nowhere making the best cup of cocoa, along with Bart recalling the kind of things Homer will do in a simple activity like fishing - it was kinda pushed on him, and he was furious with Homer at the time, so I think it's only natural he'd have turned to Flanders.

    Likewise, with all this build-up, I don't think the sudden conclusion ruined it. Bart doesn't really want to think a lot. He is like his father in some ways, he gets simple pleasure just from doing something really cool - ie. holding the bomb and getting to throw it out of the dome. That and the fact that Ned - an adult he respected so much at that time that he wanted to spend his final moments with him - not even his own mother or Lisa - actually encouraged Bart to go with Homer must have said at least something to him.

    Also, Bart saying that his father knew him was probably something he was really looking for in his relationship with him, too. That he wasn't just a nuisance and a complete burden to his father, and that his father actually knew something about Bart. There have been tone of Lisa/Homer bonding stories but much involving Bart, and looking at it from a bigger scale, I guess it'd feel like he's just being brushed aside. And Homer's simple offer was at the very least a step in the right direction.

    ... The Bart/Homer/Ned subplot was definitely my favourite part of the movie, mostly stemming from the fact that Bart's my favourite character and I thought it was well done.

  20. #410
    No, money down! Traviud's Avatar
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    Perhaps you're right. OOC isn't always bad, especially if the particular character trait that's being stepped on happens to be a negative one. I just miss that mischievous side Bart used to have, but lost sometime before Boys Of Bummer, which killed it completely. It still shows up occasionally (24 Minutes), but when it is, it's too over-the-top and cruel, rather than good-natured and amusing. There is precedence for this softer side he's been showing, mostly because of random quotes, such as his "I am the class clown" rant from Jaws Wired Shut, so I guess I (and others) should not have been broadsided by his sudden change.

    You have such a way with words, Kiyosuki. (iceiwynd's post was great too)

  21. #411


    I'd like to address some points.

    If anything, the fact that Bart has been tolerating for all this time the abuses from Homer without leaving him (excluding Barting over, that was poorly resolved too), has been cheapened the character in all these years, failing to make him more likeable and relatable. Finally in this movie they wanted to develop this issue, they sould have done it earlier.

    Bart's interest in Flanders didn't come out of nowhere, all of a sudden, but was well enough justified, showing Flanders like a person who cares about Bart, has a really friendly attitude, can teach something to Bart and who Bart can enjoy with. I would agree that in some points Bart is a bit too childish, but I don't see how these moments can affect significantly the logical flow of this plot.

    Again, the resolution was really disappointing, and saying that it can be accepted because Bart is supposed to be superficial and silly (or because he doesn't like to think too much) is just to cheapen the character and screw his characterization in order to fit a contrived story.
    Bart finally sees the qualities that a good father should have, qualities that Homer doesn't have. Saying that since Bart is only a stupid silly little child and then making something 'cool' is more important for him than to have a good father is only subtracting relevance and relatability to his character, really. And even saying that Bart is just a lame little child who is only looking for some attention from his father doesn't really help.

    Bart in the past was way more mature when it came to take emotional decisions and he was able to deal with his feelings. Now he just acts like a crazy little child nobody could relate to.

    For the record, I don't dismiss the idea that in the end Bart could decide to go back with Homer because he enjoys Homer more than Flanders and after all Homer may not be that bad, the problem is that in the movie I didn't see Bart enjoying that much with Homer and at the and I still have to think what exactly Bart thinks is worth to go back with Homer and even apologize with him.

    What I'm trying to say is that a show should try to make his characters deep and relatable, not try to make them behaving like crazy unrelatable plot devices, making the audience to think 'well, it's ok, that character acted that way because he's stupid and superficial and he just wanted some attention'.

    EDIT: Forgot to say that Marge was too silly too. People seem distracted by the great voice perfomance, but the story is not strong at all.
    Last edited by luben; 08-18-2007 at 03:34 PM.

  22. #412
    canadian. likes the hockeys arii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luben
    Again, the resolution was really disappointing, and saying that it can be accepted because Bart is supposed to be superficial and silly (or because he doesn't like to think too much) is just to cheapen the character and screw his characterization in order to fit a contrived story.
    Yeah... yeah, that's right. I'll elaborate a little on what I said (which is actually something that only recently just occured to me): He still isn't big on discussing more serious issues like that. He didn't want to say that he still cared for Lisa in Moaning Lisa, and even when he was reconciling with Lisa it took him quite a bit longer to actually tell her that he was sorry in Bart vs. Thanksgiving. So I don't think he really wants to make an unnecessarily big deal out of what Homer's done. You said it yourself, he's been able to tolerate some pretty big things from his father in the past, and I'm thinking perhaps enough time had passed for Bart to cool down a little (especially even with the situation at hand... You'd probably feel more exhausted and saddened than angry).

  23. #413


    Not exactly.

    I meant to say that Bart tolerating Homer's abuses and big flaws as a father makes him to come off like a lame pathetic child who is not able to react and rebel to things he should react to. I meant that Bart tolerating Homer for no reason has been a flaw in his characterization whenever it has been presented (very often in the last 5 years, unfortunately).
    In this movie they try to fix this flaw, and then I welcome the idea of Bart rebelling to Homer and I consider it an improvement in his character, but unfortunately it's not been pulled off well.

    In Moaning Lisa he was ashamed to say to Lisa that he loved her (something everyone has experienced with their brothers/sisters) and in Bart vs Thanksgiving Bart hasitated to apologize for his bad behavior (again, something very common to everyone). Those are the opposite situations to the movie, where Bart did nothing wrong to Homer and he had only to decide if he could come back to Homer despite Homer didn't do anything to prove him that he was/intended to be a better father. That's why Bart final decision was unresonable (or badly supported) in the movie.

  24. #414
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    That's a fine argument in terms of cause-and-effect story beats, but for all my disappointments with the movie, the believability of these two resolutions wasn't among them. They're two of the too-few honest moments the movie has to offer.

    Anyone who's lived in a home or been in a relationship plagued by ignored or insoluble emotional problems knows that it's much harder to extricate yourself from the situation than logic might dictate. That's why, as many times as we've seen a marriage crisis story or an adoptive father story, in "The Simpsons" or elsewhere, they still have resonance: they're virtually universal.

    Homer remains the patriarch of the Simpson family as much through sheer inertia as through his efforts at redemption, because Marge and Bart have a connection to their husband or father that cannot be weighed empirically against his actions. If this weren't the case, Marge would have sought romance at the end of "Life on the Fast Lane" or at least something else at the end of "Secrets of a Successful Marriage". Bart would have chosen stable support, either the ultra-cool Tom or the financial skeleton key of Mr. Burns. Their inevitable return to Homer is evidence of a stronger bond, or at least a deeper need, than rational argument.

    Granted, "The Simpsons" does not necessarily argue that their choice is the healthy or even the right one (see Marge's apologist run in "Lisa's Date with Density"), but I can't criticize its verisimilitude on this point. The movie shirked honesty in a lot of basic respects, but it still got these two right.

  25. #415


    But real families crash sometimes, so, this kind of connection beetwen the members of OFF, if really present, should be palpable or visible in some way, other than just making the members of OFF to act like if this mysterious bond was present.

    Look, my problem is not that at the end of the movie everything is back to normal, I've never thought it could have been different, my problem is that from what we saw in the movie this conclusion is contrived. I'm ok with this special bond between the members of the family, it's only that this bond is only assumed and never shown. I don't need a 'logical' implication of the resolution but an emotional implication of it.

    In the examples you made this special bond is not explained, but at least is shown or hint. In the speech of Homer with Marge, about the way she makes sandwiches, you can see Homer trying to explain something that can't be explained with words, and you can feel this bond in his clumsy words, words of a man who's trying hard to explain his feelings. And in the final run of Marge in the car, when she has to choose between Homer and Jacques, where everything she sees reminds her of her marriage.
    And even in Brother from the Same Planet the fact that Bart's actions caused Homer to get seriously injuried may be a sufficient reason to make him realize that he crossed the line and make him feel for Homer. All these thing are absent in the movie.

    How can be called 'honest' a story that appeal to a impalpable bond between persons without ever giving a clue about its presence? I know that OFF is different from many other families that crash, its just that this difference is only implied in the movie without been shown.

    Look, I think I made my points really clear and anyone can read my posts and decide to agree or not.

    Thank you for your involvement.

  26. #416


    Quote Originally Posted by SilverEagle
    Those are a stretch, IMO. Especially the Fox ad, which I found very original. How about the To Be Continued gag? I enjoyed it, but it screamed "Wiggum P.I." to me.
    Well, you can quibble with some of the specifics of my examples certainly. That's part of the reason I tried to give a lot of examples. However, it still doesn't change that I feel the movie was staying too close to gags and set pieces that they've already done on the show.

  27. #417
    and now i have slapped a king Mike Scully's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Channel Surfer
    Heh, I've been meaning to comment on the movie. Problem though is that between the 14 pages of comments here and the additional comments in the AV thread, there really isn't too much I can add that I feel is substantial. Guess I can stick to general personal impressions though.
    Heh, I was just curious to see if you liked it or not, but really excellent review of the movie! I agree with pretty much all of your comments, including stuff I didn't get around to mentioning.


    Anyway,

    I got a free ticket with my purchase of the season 6 DVD set (normal non-head box, from Amazon), and my brother wanted to watch with me, so I saw the movie again.

    I still feel generally the same, though the problems I have (ridiculous plot, nearly devoid of satire, uneven gags) seem more and more apparent on a rewatch. Regarding Bart/Flanders relationship, I can see what the writers were going for, and why Bart would want to be with Flanders, but I didn't think Bart was particularly well-written. He just seemed a bit mechanical, like in Marge's Son Poisoning.

    The comedy feels loud and in-your-face. It's not really anything like the charming humor of the classic-era, even though there are some fantastic jokes here and there that could have been in the classic-era. I wouldn't even put it in league of the best episodes of the recent years. Episodes like My Mother the Carjacker (in terms of character development and humor, and emotion) and Tis The Fifteenth Season (in terms of smart satirical writing) are far superior actually. Ultimately, the one thing I think the movie really has going for it are the gags.

  28. #418
    Out of touch old timer Nebuchanezzar's Avatar
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    I know I've asked for this before, but can we see a breakdown of who voted for what...again? Administrators and moderators, I'm looking on your direction!

  29. #419
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy C
    I know I've asked for this before, but can we see a breakdown of who voted for what...again? Administrators and moderators, I'm looking on your direction!
    Are you talking about the scores each individual user rated the movie? I gave it 1/5 if you want to add me to your shit list.

  30. #420
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    I rate the movie 4 stars out of 5. Not brilliant, but definitely worth going to see and then buying on DVD.

    I felt the movie should have focused a bit more on the rest of the townsfolk inside the dome once the family had escaped, but that might have dragged it out a bit too much. Some more guest stars wouldn't have gone a miss as well - especially Kelsey Grammar with Sideshow Bob.

    I was very impressed that they used a specific aircraft in the movie, rather than a "generic" one like they usually do (eg: the episode where Marge has a fear of flying - there aren't any 5-engined jets in service like that). And not just any aircraft, but the amazing Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey Tiltrotor, used to lower the dome in place

    There were a few typical "Simpson" moments, but no real belly laughs - something the movie could have done with: the type of moment where you're laughing so hard you almost miss what immediately follows.

    Considering how much the writers like to "rip off" other movies, I was surprised the only obvious "movie rip" was Titanic (Green Day on their violins was a pretty funny moment!). Still, it's good that they were unique and didn't feel the need to steal a storyline from somewhere else.


    I'll definitely be watching it again, probably on DVD, to see what I missed when I watched it first time.


    And finally: Spider Pig is quite possibly the best song ever
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