View Poll Results: RATE AND REVIEW THE SIMPSONS MOVIE!!

Voters
1032. You may not vote on this poll
  • 5 STARS - WOO-HOO! Completely worth the 18 year wait!

    331 32.07%
  • 4.5 STARS - Fantastic

    202 19.57%
  • 4 STARS - Excellent

    173 16.76%
  • 3.5 STARS - Really good

    95 9.21%
  • 3 STARS - It was pretty good, but could have been better

    122 11.82%
  • 2.5 STARS - Hmmm... good, I guess

    35 3.39%
  • 2 STARS - Meh, I dunno, not entirely what I wanted

    26 2.52%
  • 1.5 STARS - Not too good

    13 1.26%
  • 1 STAR - Groan, that was pretty bad

    12 1.16%
  • 0.5 STARS - Not worth the wait at all, wish it was never made

    7 0.68%
  • 0 STARS - The worst moment in Simpsons history

    16 1.55%
Page 11 of 31 FirstFirst ... 23456789101112131415161718192021 ... LastLast
Results 301 to 330 of 906



Thread: Rate & Review: THE SIMPSONS MOVIE



(Users Browsing this Thread: )

  1. #301
    kong fu hippie poochied-d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    962


    can somebody please tell me who breaking the dome solved springfields pollution problem.

  2. #302
    Mod, eh? Tomacco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,876


    Quote Originally Posted by poochied-d
    can somebody please tell me who breaking the dome solved springfields pollution problem.
    I think it's implied that they'd re-clean the lake by Lisa suggesting to Colin that they go clean up the lake, and by the fact that everyone except Homer cleaned up their act before, and Homer's transformation suggests he won't make the same selfish mistake again.
    Signature.

  3. #303
    Stonecutter Veryjammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,467


    Agreed very much with JM1878 and Bobservo here. The lack of effort struck me during the cutaway to the US government headquarters where one of the phone conversations being monitored went something like

    'You hang up'
    'No you hang up'
    'Ok'
    *hangs up*
    'She hung up on me!'

    Something like that anyway. God how old is that joke? I'd expect to see that in Friends or Scary Movie 7 or something. And then it continues to one of the government workers celebrating and dancing because the government has finally caught someone, a piece of 'satire' which isn't even subtle or deft enough to be called sledgehammer.

    As for the Bart....it's hard for me to be specific because not only was the movie four times as long as a normal episode, but I've only seen it once so I can't remember any specific quotes of the top of my head. All I can say is that watching the Ned/Bart/Homer thing and also the Marge/Homer plot made me cringe at the treacly, cheesy, subpar, OTT dialogue. As I was watching the movie I suddenly pined for dialogue of the quality in Lisa's Wedding or Lisa's Substitute or Summer Of 4 Ft 2 or Home Sweet Home Diddily Dum Doodily. Sentimental without being cloying, sweet without being treacly, touching without slipping into lazy Hollywood cliche. Insights into the hearts of characters without losing track of the very core of who the characters are. I'm well aware of Bart's character and episodes that have featured him being 'emotional' in the past, I just felt it was very overdone and unsubtle here, much like everything else in the movie, and it effectively neutered him for most of the film. I have no problem with the theory of Bart getting sick of Homer and being attracted to Flanders as a father figure, but that doesn't mean I liked the execution of it at all.

    That's my big problem really. It felt so cookie-cutter Hollywood which is almost the polar opposite of what I consider most great Simpsons episodes to be. There were a plethora of things as small as music cues and sight gags to things as big as plot points and one liners that reeked of generic Hollywood comedies (one example I can think of, the animals helping Marge and Homer undress and then have their faces contort in horror and cover their eyes. Maybe in some Dreamworks CGI it would work, here it felt horrible.)

    And yeah the movie is essentially Homer screws up badly but eventually comes good. That doesn't make it's constituent parts any more well thought out or logical (what exactly was the villains motives for most of the film, why did he suddenly turn up at the gorge of all places, why did Maggie suddenly appear above him and drop a rock on him. LAZY.) Lack of any real motives or narrative consistency makes for a boring and unfulfilling story. Comparisons to Marge Vs Monorail are misguided, that has a perfectly simple plot which makes some sort of sense:

    Town gets windfall ---> Conman convinces them to buy Monorail--->Monorail turns out to be shoddy and goes out of control with people onboard--->Anchor sticks in donut

    The anchor is obviously the main leap but it kinda makes sense and is the sort of leap the series has always demanded at points, like a carbon rod keeping the door of a spaceship shut and then being given a parade. I don't know if I could even begin to do something like the above for this movie because there's no real reason for anything that happens to take place. And let's not forget that Marge Vs Monorail is actually funny and doesn't mercilessly pander to the lowest common denominator while meekly recycling gags from the past while reciting corny, vomit inducing dialogue from the Hollywood Hacks Handbook.

    Maybe the writers should credit George Meyer, Jon Vitti, David Mirkin, James L.Brooks et al with every new episode, the cynic inside of me suggests it might earn them higher accolades amongst fans for that reason alone.

  4. #304
    Profound Sadness Kiyosuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    10,781


    I think it's implied that they'd re-clean the lake by Lisa suggesting to Colin that they go clean up the lake, and by the fact that everyone except Homer cleaned up their act before, and Homer's transformation suggests he won't make the same selfish mistake again.

    Yeah, its not really touched on and it never implies that it magically cleans up the lake and town. They just got to live, which is kind of worth it. You're just left to assume that maybe this time, having been so close to annihalation and Homer being punished for his ignorance, the town's and Homer have gone through a big change and maybe become a little wiser for the ware.

    Who knows, maybe they don't, although I'd like to think at least they put up an effort to clean up the lake. Some things change, but some things don't like Homer being accident prone. They're only human...ish. I kind of liked it like that.

    If all else fails, think of it as an alternate dimension or something.

  5. #305
    in the back of a pick-up Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    26,882
    Blog Entries
    5


    Tomacco has a point about the storyline, it's just that the end is just simply way, way too rushed. On my second viewing, I checked my watch for the time when Homer was being guided by the Boob Lady, and lo and behold 65 minutes was over already (yes, this does not include the previews, just the movie). The end credits are about six, seven minutes...I just couldn't believe the movie wraps up in 15 minutes! But it does!

    What they needed was at least an extra ten minutes. 97 minutes is still not long for a comedy nowadays, especially in an era where comedies are constantly exceeding the two hour mark. (almost all movies are now, damn you Peter Jackson!) Along with that, the ending needed a bit of restructuring.

    What would I have done? Okay, if you insist...

    -First of all, after Homer is guided by the Boob Lady, the sausage truck scene that was cut or some other scene would be featured. At least something that's quick (talking about thirty seconds to a minute) that explains how Homer got to Springfield. Just having him appear is lazy writing, even the argument of ignoring logic doesn't solve that one. It's a plot hole, plain and simple.

    -Bulldozer scene works just fine (I'm deeply sorry for all of you idiots who want it out just because you saw the November teaser a million times, just save it for the next generation who will love that scene), as well as Homer's attempts to get in. The theory of three's is worked well here (bulldozer, guard, jet pack for jokes, super glue getting him in [and still funny!]). This stuff does not need to be fixed. However, I would have included Lisa talking about how much she misses Colin with Marge. This could help tie together both plots for resolution at the ending. (though Marge does wish Homer was with her when doomsday is announced)

    -The stuff inside the dome is good until Cargill appears on the TV screen. The Springfielders should have ARGUED with him. Why they didn't is insanely stupid. The simple "run and scream at sight of bomb" joke is worth sacrificing. I would have Springfield in confusion about their deaths, and Cargill manipulating them like he did Arnold. Marge and Lisa would tell of his plans, and they would all get angry at Cargill, furthering amplifying why the forgive Homer: because he abolished this evil man's plan and wound up saving all of their asses. This is alluded to in the actual film, but this would give it better depth. Anyways, Cargill would simply laugh it off, saying, "well, there's nothing YOU idiots can do about it anyway! Goodbye, Springfield". Cargill starts of course, to watch as the bomb is set. Instead of running off, they wonder what's their way out, and Lenny points out the rope and hatches the plan like in the actual film. Then Homer falls through and the plot moves like so.

    -The ending at this point is well done, with Homer trying to round up the family, and discovering a way to fix it all. Instead of driving around and Homer saying that he's helping people he hates, he first goes to Bart and convinces him to join. Then we shift to the town square when the townspeople's hope is shattered, and someone mentioning how much they hate Cargill. Homer rushes in, and someone could even say "hey, it's that guy we hated before!" They all shove their heads off to him, like the rest of his family did. Then Homer says some cliched meaningful speech that only gets to Marge, but the rest of the townspeople react poorly. Someone, preferably Moe says, "I didn't live so my final moments would be listening to some stupid speech!" Homer and Bart ride off in the prospect that actions speak louder than words. The two have their reconcilation like so. Marge, as Homer rides off, questions to Lisa, "Have you seen Maggie?"

    -Yeah, the confrontation with Cargill is a bit lame, but it could be beefed up by him declaring some of his motivations. Him acting a little more threatening would be nice, as well as what he's going to do after he kills Homer. "It doesn't matter", he calmly spouts, "I'll just have my men block all exits and we'll restart like normal"...just better written and more funny, of course. He points the shotgun and he conked out by something more massive than a boulder. I'm glad Maggie doesn't shoot him, though, too idiotic. (Person in audience: Oh, I get it! It's just like when she shot Mr. Burns! That's hilarious! [shudder]) Marge's line beforehand makes it more sensible. While I'm all for randomness, that line just makes it a better build up and payoff.

    -And my final touch would be whatever cut scene the pig had, damn it. I'm fine with Colin and Lisa's wrap up, just a bit better of a send-off line than "Sorry, I'm a bit sweaty". But the pig would be in it no matter what.

    The rest is fine, but all this restructuring would only take ten minutes extra, and it would make the ending seem less rushed...
    twitter

    Quote Originally Posted by IdiotDetector View Post
    Two and a Half Men is no more an "adult show" than "Rocket Power."

  6. #306
    pretty rad
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    taco town
    Posts
    18,339


    I was thinking about making this some long-winded review, where I compare The Simpsons to someone you love but now it's really disrespecting you and you just want to leave it or HEY OK BAD ANALOGY, but let's skip that part.

    I loved the movie.

    This is exactly what I'd imagine a Simpsons move would be. Better animation, a great multl-layered story, lots of characters getting in the act, a small threat of fucking with the show's continuity-- it all happened, and it was as close to perfect as it could be.

    Granted, it had flaws: there were some minor oddities in the plot (I'm aware everyone's already pointed them out); some of the jokes were more late-season lame than classic-season lolworthy; and yeah, it did go a bit too fast in places. But the fact that it was a much longer, higher-quality product seemed to mask these problems a bit more.

    Overall, however, this had an extremely classic feel to it. It didn't seem at times to try to cram too many jokes into a scene, although there were scenes that were full of jokes that did very well.

    I wish I could think of more to talk about, but I'll probably give my input later on.
    newest fad! twitter | the photodump | facebook
    [00:29] AlonsoWDC: hank hill would cum out of his mouth in disgust if he were here right now

  7. #307
    Put it in "H" schwnj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    115


    I'm getting some interesting insight by reading the various opinions (especially the negative ones). I have a sneaking suspicion that, several months from now our opinions of the movie will change, such that those of you who rated it a 5/5 will come down a bit, and those who rated it a 1/5 will realize it wasn't that bad. I'd be interested to see what would happen if NHC had a new R&R poll once the DVD had come and gone and the movie had slipped into the background (a year or so).

  8. #308
    AddminisGator Gatorgod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Swamptopia
    Posts
    12,753


    5/5 ...I loved it!
    Haven't laughed so much during a film in so long. I'm still on cloud 9
    Soo many golden moments, Cool surprises, practically every big budget film I saw this Summer were merely fun to watch while I sat there, but 2 seconds after leaving the theater, I'm thinking about what I'd like to do next, and the film I just saw is considered "Over & Done with".. Just something to check off my list.

    Not this movie! It stayed with me as I went out of the theater and followed me home. I cant shake it, so I might as well adopt it! The Simpson's movie was just as special to see as it was to wait in anticipation for.


  9. #309
    Profound Sadness Kiyosuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    10,781


    Quote Originally Posted by schwnj
    I'm getting some interesting insight by reading the various opinions (especially the negative ones). I have a sneaking suspicion that, several months from now our opinions of the movie will change, such that those of you who rated it a 5/5 will come down a bit, and those who rated it a 1/5 will realize it wasn't that bad. I'd be interested to see what would happen if NHC had a new R&R poll once the DVD had come and gone and the movie had slipped into the background (a year or so).
    I think what it comes down to is that this movie was specifically designed not to be 100% like a particular era of the show's history. Its kind of an algamation of the show's entire run, with qualities from every era in there somewhere formed together into something sort of unique. Because the Simpsons really is kind of its own worst enemy now since there are so many varying fond memories of a particular time or episode that some will warm up to it as its own entity, and some won't because its not totally like a certain part of the show.

    There are valid flaws in the film, but generally considering the huge weight these guys had on their shoulders to make the film work as one big representation of the Simpsons on the big screen I think they did a commendable job.

  10. #310
    and now i have slapped a king Mike Scully's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Westeros
    Posts
    3,903


    Quote Originally Posted by Veryjammy
    As for the Bart....it's hard for me to be specific because not only was the movie four times as long as a normal episode, but I've only seen it once so I can't remember any specific quotes of the top of my head. All I can say is that watching the Ned/Bart/Homer thing and also the Marge/Homer plot made me cringe at the treacly, cheesy, subpar, OTT dialogue.
    I agree about Bart/Flanders not being plausible. I did find Bart/Flanders rather touching, mainly because it was nice to see a bit of the old Flanders back, but more I think about it, i doesn't really work in terms of Bart's characterization at all. After Bart's complete cynical sarcastic disdain for Flanders' homelife all throughout Home Sweet Home Diddily Dum Doodily, after Bart's comparatively easy acceptance of Mr. Burns ("Mr. Burns nurtures my desturctive side"), it would have taken something huge for Bart to suddenly see Flanders as a father figure. But Flanders just give Bart some hot cocoa and doesn't strangle Bart, and suddenly Bart is all, "Daddy!!" Too naive for Bart.

  11. #311
    Profound Sadness Kiyosuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    10,781


    Well Homer did also do something pretty damn crappy (like even the cops looked a bit amazed) to him earlier and Flanders was the only one nice to him. It gets exaggerated a bit later, but I didn't think it was out of Bart's range. If anything, I think it was better than if he was just his typical self all throughout, that would have been a bit predictable. Some of Bart's best moments are when we see that a lot of that roughness, troublesome behavior, and cynisism are really just the surface of his personality, he's actually a lot more sensitive and decent on the inside. No matter how cynical he may seem to be he's still only 10, even after 18 years. Most 10 year olds just want a little appreaciation and acknowledgement.

    Maybe it wasn't so much for love of Flanders than just being angry at Homer. I mean, not only the stuff I said above but also knowing that he doomed his entire home town and is completely indifferent to it before his epiphany and its not hard to see why he'd be really really pissed at his dad. When he's um, drunk, and he says to Marge that she's just bought yet another load of crap from Homer I thought that was a little poignant considering how much Homer gets away with. To really emphasize that Homer's just gone too far this time, and Bart's patience just ran out. He could fool Marge and maybe the rest but not him by that point, he knew his dad too well.

    Of course he loves him though, so when Homer comes back and is actually sincere about fixing things Bart goes to him. Its a bit of a stretch that all it took was "you can hold the bomb", but I think generally it got the point across.

  12. #312
    Stonecutter KoenSoontjens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    belgium
    Posts
    1,287


    Quote Originally Posted by bobservo
    This disappointed me the most. Everything in the movie was geared towards a dumb summer audience instead of fans of good, intelligent comedy - even though the movie would have been just as successful had it been smarter. Overuse of slapstick plus messages of sub South Park caliber made this film not even seem like a NEW episode of The Simpsons. And a movie of season 18 quality would have been much, much better. The audience was already there, so I have no idea why they decided so much pandering was necessary.

    If this movie were broken down into three different episodes, they would have fallen squarely within the worst parts of the Scully years and everyone would have hated them. Instead, blind fanaticism is making people who hate the movie sheepish about voicing their opinions.

    And JM1878, that was a terrific review. Not just because I agree with it, but because it's also a great piece of critical writing.
    "worse than season 18" am i reading this correctly.this movie is sertainly better than season 18,i laughed more at the movie than in the entier 18th season.i realy think you are being to harsh to the movie.this is the best simpsons material since season 10.

  13. #313


    Quote Originally Posted by Kiyosuki
    Most 10 year olds just want a little appreaciation and acknowledgement.
    After all, Bart is kind of an attention-holic. Not only was Homer a dick to him, he also started focusing his attention on the pig instead of Bart. Flanders gave him the attention he wanted. I feel like anyone saying this is out of character should watch some classic episodes where his obsession with attention peaks through(Lisa. vs. Malibu Stacy immediately comes to mind. I'd have to think a little harder for more examples, but I know there are some).
    Quote Originally Posted by simpsonsfan20 View Post
    My view: You can show pictures of people in the nude, you can show pictures of people having sex, you can even show kids naked, but SHOW HOMER 'DOING IT' WITH LISA AND I'LL HUNT YOU DOWN.

  14. #314


    Okay, it’s been long enough. Can’t.. hold… back…


    DYN

    The film doesn’t really open “with an I&S cartoon” – rather it simulates this effect by having OFF watching an I&S cartoon in a movie theatre, and thereby setting up Homer’s opening meta-joke-on –the-audience. Also, notice the ‘film paradoxes’ being played with: the tv-series family is watching a film adaptation of their own cartoon-within-a-cartoon as they themselves make the transition to film, and that the I&S cartoon is displayed on ‘our’ screens in the ‘television’ aspect ratio (of 1.85:1), which then switches to the film-proper’s Cinemascope aspect ratio (2.35:1) when we switch perspectives to OFF in the theatre itself;

    The “expanded main-titles” from the tv series goes as follows: a new cloud sequence and “The Simpsons” chorale is accompanied by Frink, pedaling by in his flying-winged-bicycle contraption, towing a banner that reads “The Movie”, while saying “on the big screen!”; pull in over various landmarks in Springfield Heights, such as the Observatory (modeled on L.A.’s Griffith Park Observatory); we enter a window in Burns’ Mansion and see Burns & Smithers (Smithers hands Burns a , causing him to fall over forward); we pan over to the Kwik-E-Mart and see Apu masking expiration dates; we then pull out and over to SE, where the bullies are hoisting Martin up the flagpole by his wedgied underwear; we pan over to Bart blackboarding “I will not illegally download this film”; then we pan over to Springfield Lake and the Duff Concert barge with Green Day performing – and the Zimmer-orchestrated Main Theme fades into Green Day’s version of the Theme.

    Billy Armstrong of Green Day’s floor-teleprompter feeds him the Theme’s lyrics: Da da da da da da ……(etc.);

    At the concert, the Duff Blimp is overhead with the sign: “Duff Beer - Binge Responsibly”;

    The Nerds (Doug, Gary, and Benjamin) begin hoisting CBG over their heads to start his crowd-surf, and Smitty (Stamp the Ticket), Shawn (the Gen X’er) and Krusty’s G.I. baby-momma are among the concertgoers in the front row;

    When we cut to the church, we open on Marth Feesh, the longtime church organist. The pews feature Jacob Marley, Birch Barlow, Jessica Lovejoy, and many, many others;

    Homer’s use of “Jebus” (from ‘Missionary” and thereafter);

    Grampa’s rant in church – a general parody of many such ‘old man’ type foreboding rants in old sci-fi films – also actually works in giving clues to Marge that foreshadow the awful elements of the toxic lake situation. She uses the popular word-refrigerator-magnets to parse them: “twisted tail” (Plopper the pig), “one-thousand eyes” (the toxed squirrel), “Epa Epa Epa” (the E.P.A.), and “trapped forever” (the dome);

    Homer’s list of chores: Fill sinkhole / hornet’s nest / fix roof

    Bart climbing up the tv antenna was slightly reminiscent of the Ullman short “TV Simpsons”, and notice that they still rely on such an antenna in the days of cable and satellite dishes (which OFF has also briefly enjoyed);

    When Homer falls through the roof, Grampa is seen reading “Oatmeal Enthusiast” magazine;

    When Lisa is rejected door-to-door, we see that the Princes live next-door to Bumblebee man, who lives next door to where McCallister docks his houseboat. Notice that we see Pedro and his wife (from “22”), but when their dog slams the doggie-door shut, it is a different dog than their normal Chihuahua. (We see Pedro & wife again in the crowds as the dome is lowered);

    When Lisa meets Colin, the background music becomes dominated by tin-whistles – a very traditional “Irish” instrument & sound cue;

    Bart skateboards by (Otto’s ex) Becky, Richard and Lewis playing, Moleman’s windshield, etc., all while his naughty bits were cleverly and barely concealed (which is a very-old comedy staple.) My favorite one was when we viewed him from over Agnes’ shoulder, and she pointed to him across the screen, with her fingertip covering his bits up the entire time – while she yelled “Nobody look where I’m pointing right now!”;

    Wiggum warns “Stop in the name of American squeamishness!”; when he’s manacled Bart to the pole, he is surrounded by Nelson, Herman, Sanjay, the hardware shop owner, and Dr. Zweig (Marge’s psychiatrist);

    We transition to inside Krustyburger via camera-angle from inside Homer’s mouth as he eats a burger;

    Krusty’s bacon-laden burger is called “The Clogger”, due to what it does to one’s arteries;

    The flashback to H&B’s fishing trip was a bit reminiscent of their fishing trip in the Ullman short “Fishing”;

    Ned’s fancy cup of cocoa consists of hot cocoa topped with whipped cream, fresh chocolate shavings, a chocolate wafer, and more whipped cream;

    Polluting the lake are Krusty draining flop-sweat, Cat Lady washing her filthy cats, and

    Lenny & Carl’s hazard-suits melt away right off of them after they exit the lake;

    The Lardlad statue is miscolored pretty oddly – I’d say that it was the ‘lighting’, for effect, except that the other characters at Lardlad’s were colored correctly;

    When Wiggum’s eating donuts off his gun barrel, and it goes off, it takes out a good-sized chunk of his police cap’s visor;

    Pres. Schwarzeneggar was a stroke of genius – he wants to be Prez, we know he wants to be Prez – but he will not ever be Prez, due to his birth in Austria. (He could only do so by ratification of the US constitution – which usually takes a few decades to do, if it can get done at all.) Sure, this made his doppelganger Ranier Wolfcastle unusable – but, hey… we know what they were getting across.

    In the White House, Cargill walks by portraits of Presidents Teddy Roosevelt, Washington, and Lincoln;

    Cargill’s “Option 3” is the placement of a containment dome over Springfield – and the dome is manufactured by “Cargill Domes” – a nice and profitable conflict-of-interest;

    The infamous “Panicky Guy” is in the film – debating out loud whether to be in or out of the dome. He dithers until it squashes him, while he blurts out his last words – “Argh – I never saw Venice!”

    Homer yells “D’oh… m!” (“dome”) as the dome is lowered;

    The lowered dome crushes the second “I” of the “Springfield” sign, as well as half the see-saw in the SE Yard (causing Martin to whip into the air and splat against another part of the dome and slide down);

    When Kent notes that the town is running out of Botox (the anti-aging chemical face-treatment), his face’s old flesh sags loosely (an effect that Botox counters). He pulls his face taut from the back and holds it in place with a clothespin;

    Marge is sitting in a porch-swing that is entirely new to their yard for the scene where she first thinks Maggie’s escaped;

    Marge needlepoints the homily “Dome Sweet Dome” (play on “Home Sweet Home”). Later, in Alaska, there’s a call back as she has needlepointed “Nome Sweet Nome” (Nome is a city in Alaska);

    When Homer tries to drive from the angry mob, he hits Barney, who sails over OFF’s car-hood;

    The OFF trophy cabinet includes an "Honorable Mention" trophy; Marge can't even leave one dirty dish in the sink;

    As they leap from the treehouse, Bart yells the traditional yell “Geronimo”, and then Lisa yells “Sacajaweya!” adding a feminist twist by yelling the name of a famous female Native-American instead;

    As Homer’s head is slowly sinking in the sandbox, it is clawed by many people including Snake, raked by Willie, and struck by Nelson’s red arrow – which gets extracted outside the dome;

    A dog dish and several Frisbees and balls fall off of OFF's roof when it's drawn into the sinkhole – implying that even though Homer and Bart were had just been working on the roof – they had neglected to get down all of the items that had gotten stuck up there over the years;

    Lisa reads Colin’s song’s notation, then sings it – and then it’s played by the orchestra in the soundtrack;

    When Maggie sits upright in her drawer/bed, and when she skeptically assess Marge and leans over, the drawer creaks loudly;

    Homer’s lament over the question “where is your High School Equivalency degree?” is a nice callback to him earning this degree in “New Kid”;

    Homer, after extolling America, opens the curtain to reveal neon billboards in Korean, Spanish, Russian, Greek, and Japanese;

    The Carny from whom Homer wins the truck has the same Hank voice as Farmer Billy in “Simple”;

    The Carny’s “Siamese (conjoined) twin” wives appear to actually be Siamese (and he would appear to also be a bigamist);

    Moe’s features round stools at the bar (usually they’re squared), and as the lights go back on, they are still swiveling as though the barflys had just raced out of the bar. Moe’s underwear is promotional, with “Duff” printed on his, well, duff, and when the lights go on again, the door is still swinging closed;

    The truckstop clerk has Hank’s Raphael/Wiseguy voice, in the same manner that, in the earlier seasons, other clerks and workers used to;

    Marge’s sudden decision to not get razor blades because “we’re European” – while really said to keep the clerk distracted from the Wanted poster – implies that she believes the stereotype that European women do not shave their armpits, legs, etc.;

    Per Kent’s later broadcast, the town is under the dome - and OFF has been ‘on the road’ - for at least 93 days (three months!);

    Drederick Tatum punches the dome to break it, and – after checking that no one is watching him – delivers 4 or 5 “low-blow” punches to it;

    Ralph blows bubbles against the dome, but when some pop in his face, he laments “Blowback!” and cries. (‘Blowback’ is a term meaning ‘the unexpected retaliation to a secret government operation – usually by the CIA, FBI, etc.)

    Stampy the elephant butts his head on the dome, successfully cracking it a bit;

    The town’s location – and the location for the “New Grand Canyon” – is described by Tom Hanks as east of Shelbyville and south of Capital City;

    Cargill’s ‘option 4’ is the bombing of the target city;

    In the Alaska home, the landscape painting above the bed is signed “Marge”, indicating that she’s still painting (“Brush”) and getting much better at it;

    Homer drinks at “Eski-Moe’s”;

    Notice that it was much darker outdoors when Marge made the videotape message to Homer than when he came home to view it – he likely stayed out all night and came home in the morning, which left time for Marge and the kids to make some headway;

    In the wedding videotape, we see a (previously unseen) ceremony, which was attended by (at least) Lenny, Carl, Barney, and Grandma Bouvier;

    When the tape ends, we see Homer's reflection in the tv;

    The polar bear kicks a snow fox out of disappointment;

    Homer calls the medicine woman “boob lady” due to he enormous bust. She later uses her bust to point Homer in the right direction – in the shadow of her cleavage;

    Its implied that Homer has left a number of misspelled fake signs, from the EPA agent’s comment that they shouldn’t stop for any more “Sop” (stop), “Yeld” (yield), or “One Vay” (one-way) signs;

    Bart and Lisa continue kicking each other after they are gassed and passed out;

    In ‘feral’ Springfield, Moe addresses Marge as “Midge” which he’s done on the show before; and the bear from the Jebediah statue has mysteriously developed three eyes;

    Off-screen, after “Emperor” Moe has flung the Molotov cocktail back at him, Barney relents, and yells back to Moe: “Okay – Hail Emperor!”

    The hole in the top of the dome is labeled “Cargill Dome Plugs” – he really is personally profiting from this operation;

    During the impending bombing, the churchgoers (the Lovejoys, Feesh, Miss Albright) run into to Moe's Tavern (having abandoned faith for drink) and Moe's drunkards (Moe, Barney, Larry, Sam, and Ruth Powers, flock to the church (abandoning drink and trying to find salvation before death);

    In a misdirection joke, Homer looks past the available jet-pack (which would have been perfect) to choose super-glue to climb the dome;

    When Homer rips his glued fingers from his crotch, there are four patches torn from his pants (four fingers);

    CBG, when assessing his life, is waving around his favored “Zebra Girl” comic books;

    Church marquee: “We Told You So”;

    Rodd and Tod are visibly nervous when Ned hugs child Bart in the church;

    The bomb-removal robot’s suicide – and Wiggum’s “I never took him seriously…”, is a nice parody of a cop-story cliché;

    Homer again mangles “epiphany” as “epiphedry”;

    Homer steals his white (hero’s) cowboy hat from Rich Texan’s head as he begins his cycle-ride;

    Martin’s inspired vengeance on the bullies is a great retort to the ‘opening credits’ scene with them;

    The EPA helicopter is numbered H-270;

    Otto appears to be smoking a Graphix brand bong in the bus’s stairwell, and his sleeves are rolled up, revealing a pot-leaf tattoo on his right shoulder;

    Marge “drops a G-bomb” - as that current phrase is used - by actually saying “goddamn bomb”;

    In their “feral” versions, Willie is wearing a ragged kilt, and Princess Kashmir is wearing jungle pelts as a bikini. We later see that Milhouse’s glasses are held together with tape on the bridge, and Jimbo’s straight hair is poofed out and curly;

    As the dome explodes into small particles, Ralph tries to catch the 'flakes' on his tongue.

    As H&B jump the gorge on the motorcycle (which appears to go further carrying H&B than just Homer got on solely a skateboard,) you can see the ambulance on the ‘far’ side still crushed against the tree it hit in “Daredevil”’s famous scene (one of Matt’s faves);

    In the overhead shot of the relieved crowd as the bomb teeters on the edge of the hole, the entire town does a “Charles Nelson Reilly” collar-pull in unison;

    In the overhead shot of the relieved crowd after the bomb doesn’t drop, Cletus and Brandine begin making out;

    Bart’s made-up “The Treasure of Ima Weiner” is a nice callback and twist to the phrase that Bart has graffitti’d a number of times as coming out of Skinner’s mouth;

    After she saves the day (for the second time, after leading to the sinkhole,) again, Homer calls Maggie his “Great Little Accident” (like the other kids, Maggie wasn’t planned);

    Homer’s “Best kiss of your life… so far is a call back to Homer’s earlier correction to Bart, “worst day of your life… so far.”

    As H&M ride off on the motorcycle, you can see Otto and Becky reuniting;

    Early in the credits (but after Burns and Smithers have a short scene) we get a short return to Tom Hanks at the scene of his “New Grand Canyon” promo: “Hi, this is Tom Hanks, asking you – if you see me out in public, please leave me be.” (This was one of my favorite jokes - ed.)

    Current writers Joel Cohen, John Frink, Tim Long and Mike Price got credits because they contributed jokes that made it into the film.

    Danny Elfman was somewhat involved in the score – his longtime partner (since the Oingo Boingo days) and co-producer Steve Bartek help orchestrate the Main Theme (which Elfman wrote);

    During the credits, they play the “Springfield Anthem”, a recorded-but-cut song, which is to the tune of “The Marseilles” – the French national anthem. Notable line celebrating the French from the lyrics: “Making love, wine and cheese / Roquefort, camembert and bries”;

    Late in the credits, we see OFF in the bottom-right corner of the screen, “Mystery Science Theatre 3000” – style. Homer is excited by finding floor-popcorn, Lisa wants to be sure that no animals were harmed in the production of the film, and sees the credit confirming this to be the case. Marge readies everyone for Maggie’s first word – and Maggie (voiced by Nancy) says “sequel”. (Marge would believe "sequel" to be Maggie's first word because – when she said “Daddy” in ‘First Word’, there were no witnesses but us.)

    There is a credit “Filmed entirely on location in Springfield”;

    At the close of the credits, the SVT enters the screen as if he is working at “your theatre”, cleaning up the front rows. He cleans up gum, and laments that he is doing this although an “assistant manager”, and that he spent “4 years of film school for this?

    Not a single one of “O&W’s Characters” (i.e., the ones that O&W get continuing payments on,) spoke in the movie, although they appeared in the bg. (This would be Chalmers, Luigi, Duffman, etc.)

    There were only four items that earned the film a PG-13, collectively: Bart’s naked genitals; Homer’s double-middle-finger salute to the townspeople (notice how his four-fingered hands were somewhat off-model in order to better simulate the middle-finger-salutes); Marge’s “goddamn bomb” (which was pretty shocking to hear, from Marge, after all these years, even though it’s a fairly mild expletive); and Otto’s bong-hit.



    REF

    The I&S short opens with a shot of NASA’s ‘Lunar Lander’, in a parody of actual footage from the 1969 moon landing;

    After retired-astronaut Itchy is elected president, - with former First Lady Hillary Clinton at his side for the swearing-in ceremony - he walks past a portrait of mouse-Lincoln when entering the White House;

    The scene of Itchy leaning on desk in the Oval Office at night, shot from behind him, is a parody of a famous photo of JFK during the Cuban Missle Crisis;

    The (misleading and erroneous – but funny ) I&S headline is in “The Washington Post” – the RL newspaper that is famous for investigating Watergate and the Vietnam War, but which is now derided for swallowing the WMD/Iraq stories hook, line and sinker;

    [As with most I&S cartoons, this one also reflects/foreshadows/comments upon the main plot of the ep/film: Itchy initiates a huge WMD strike/disaster solely in order to cover-up and distract from his potentially embarrassing earlier lethal-and-destructive decisions – just like Cargill. Smart viewers will also read into this a wider subtle narrative criticizing the current Bush administration.]

    The “Duff Summer Concert Series” on the barge is a parody of many RL free-to-the-public concerts put on by cities and co-sponsored by alcohol companies (make closely the perennial Santa Monica, CA summer shows in which the performer is on a pier and the audience is on the shore.)

    The sinking barge parodies ‘Titanic’ (the actual event, and the Cameron film,) in how it sinks, and in the way Green Day’s actions mirror those of the string-quartet during the sinking (“Gentlemen, it has been an honor to play with you”, going down playing the same waltz, and – from the film – falling ‘down’ the deck and bouncing off other items on the way down,)

    Maggie – and, later in the film, Bart – plays a game “BabyBlast” on a PS2 player in church;

    Grampa does a floor-walk in church a la Curly from “The Three Stooges” (as Homer memorably did in ‘Exit’);

    Grampa’s “Oatmeal Enthusiast” is a play on “Wine Enthusiast” magazine;

    Lisa's presentation "An Irritating Truth" is a play on Al Gore's '06 documentary "An Inconvenient Truth";

    The crawl during the carnival-like rifle game between H&B parodies Fox’s (and other network’s) constant promotion of other shows during successful shows;

    Marge's piecing together Grampa's cryptic phrases from church is a nod to "The DaVinci Code" novel and film;

    When Homer tells Bart that he’ll be known as a chicken, and Homer will sing at his wedding “Bok bok bok-bok..”, he is singing “The Wedding March”;

    When challenged on clothing Bart, Homer asks “Who am I, Tommy Bahama?” “Tommy Bahama” is the obviously-fake-named line of ‘beachy’ casual clothing for Nordstrom’s chain stores;

    [Can someone give me the proper name of the song that was played as Homer daydreams about Plopper – I think its “For All of My Life”…]

    Homer’s song “Spider-pig” is a parody of the theme to the 1960s animated Spiderman show, and “Hairy Plopper” is, of course, a play of J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” (and Plopper has the lightning-scar and glasses of Potter);

    Krusty unloads a tanker full of “Flop Sweat” – which is the old-time showbiz term for the sweat one makes when you know that you’re failing on-stage with your act;

    Homer’s indignant insistence that the pig-crap silo was “not leaking! Its overflowing”… is a reference to the same quote from Michael Brown, in defending FEMA’s screwing up in the wake of Hurrican Katrina flooding New Orleans. (He defended his assessments of the dams and locks surrounding that city in these same words);

    The toxic cloud forming a skull-and-crossbones (the sign for “poison”) and a spoken “evil!” is right out of old 40’s cartoons – its been used in ‘Casper’ and ‘Popeye’ cartoons, and for some reason I want to think that it was also in “Snow White” (when the wicked Queen poisons the apple – but I’m just not sure);

    The pig-poop part of the plot came to Matt after he read articles about pig-waste disasters: over the 80s & 90s, the pork industry boomed via factory farms, and regulations failed to keep up. Pigs produce 3x the waste that humans do, and huge quantities of the stuff began overflowing ditches and cesspools (and, in many disastrous cases, it leaked out of plastic-lined storage tanks,) and flowed into the local water systems, polluting and fouling the water with feces and chemicals, causing illness and toxifying the local water;

    The squirrel has 18 - then 19 – eyes, and is a callback to both Blinky the 3-eyed fish and the squirrel that developed radioactive-vision eyes from Burns’ toxc waste in “Monorail” – but worse;

    Russ Cargill displays a few different aspects of “government officials”. As he represents to the President, he is a very-successful private businessman who “just wants to give back” (“something”) to the country that was so good to him, so he takes a position in the government - although in a field he doesn’t seem too qualified for (which is another common criticism of many appointed positions in all governments). But, as we see over the course of the film, he is actually more of an idiot who doesn’t have good ideas, doesn’t give the full details to the President but bluffs and presses him into bad decisions, covers up his own bad decisions by misdirecting government resources, and, most tellingly, his own company is supplying items to the government – so he’s personally profiting from his position and decisions. (Sort of like Halliburton, Bechtel, etc., in Iraq.) Cargill was originally designed as a “rich, white man”, not too far from US VP Dick Cheney – however, it was thought that he actually came off looking much more like Fox CEO Rupert Murdoch in his own previous appearances on the show, so they redesigned him in a different direction.

    The President’s reference to “I miss Danny DeVito…” refers to Arnold’s two comedies with DeVito, “Twins” and “Junior”;

    The cops arrive in “S.P.D. Hometown Security” vehicles, which is a parody of the US’s post 9-11 “OHS – Office of Homeland Security” department and personnel;

    Springfiled gets purged from the data of a driver’s ‘GPS’ system in his car (Global Positioning System) – implying that the town only exists if maps recognize and include them;

    The Channel 6 news’ “cool name” for the crisis is “Trappucino”, a play on Starbucks Coffee’s trademarked frozen drink “Frappucino”;

    The “swallows returning to Sprigfield” is a play in the real annual return flight of swallows returning to Capistrano (google it);

    There is a KBBL radio ad for “Dome Depot”, which is a play of the home-improvement chain store “Home Depot”;

    Homer’s fakery of a chainsaw to stop the people clwing through holes in his dooe is a parody of many such scene in the “Living Dead” films and other zombie movies;

    “Coloring your arrow red” as Nelson was doing, was a Native-American method of tracking individual’s arrows;

    The sleazy “Red Rash Inn” parodies “Red Roof Inn”, a US chain;

    Bart drinks hotel-room-sized bottles of “Johnny Walker Red” scotch – but we can’t read the labels;

    Maggie sitting upright in her drawer-bed is a parody of old-time movie-vampires;

    Homer’s “crisis plans” include a “Get Out Of Jail Free” card from a ‘Monopoly’ game set; a picture of Michael Jordan (from the 80’s in his Chicago Bulls basketball uniform) doing an ‘Air Jordan’ slam-dunk, with Homer’s face taped over Jordan’s; and a picture map of Alaska;

    The “Alaska money” is based in truth; there are any number of companies and state promotional funds that do provide tax refunds, cash bonuses, and ‘incentives’ to lure workers up to the refinery business in Alaska;

    In the ‘romantic’ scene of H&M in their bedroom in Alaska, they are assisted – and then watched – by the birds from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves” (who assisted her, in Walt Disney’s film – which was the first animated feature-film ever made) and then by Bambi and his father (from Disney’s subsequent film “Bambi” – the father uses his antlers to rip Marge’s dress off!). They are then joined by two Disney-esque beavers, and a Bald Eagle, too, which flew in to reinforce the birds;

    The book club of Helen, Luann, Agnes, Edna, Hoover and Naegle is reading and discussing – again, apparently – the schmaltzy book by Mitch Albom “Tuesdays with Morrie”. Naegle says that the other members are “the five people [she’ll] meety in Hell!” – which is a play on Albom’s follow-up book, “The Five People You’ll Meet in Heaven”. (And, yes, Azaria won an Emmy for his role in the “Morrie” tv movie too).

    The President’s past embarrassing family-comedies include the pictured poster for “Diaper Genie”, featuring Arnold as a Genie coming out of a bawling baby’s bottle, which is a ref to the film “The Pacifier” (and to a lesser extent, real Arnold films like ‘Kindergarten Cop’). A “diaper genie” is actually the receptacle into which new parents throw their infants’ dirty diapers;

    Homer notes that “Access Hollywood” – one of many syndicated daily entertainment “news” shows – airs at both 4:00 and 7:00 pm, satirizing the predominance of these shows in the evening ‘syndication hours’ (from 4 pm to 8 pm), and also Homer’s intimate familiarity with them;

    In Alaska, Homer plays “Grand Theft Walrus”, an Arctic-themed parody of the gane “Grand Theft Auto” – and, in it, the walrus shotguns a cute little penguin – which plays off of the number of very-recent animated family films featuring penguins as protagonists;

    Bart – on the train with a black brassiere on his head - is imitating Disney’s Mickey Mouse (in voice and ‘ears’) when he says he’s “the mascot of an evil corporation!”;

    The NSA agent – and the entire cavernous phonecall-monitoring operation listening in on calls – parodies the current US administration’s still-secret methods of monitoring electronic communications, and its effectiveness too;

    The Inuit Medicine Woman/ Shaman is actually using the Tuvali (from the South Pacific) native’s method of “Throat-singing” which is very distinctive;

    When Homer is dancing – trying to ‘frenzy’ himself into an “epifagee” – one of the silly hand-jive-moves is actually the infamous “Batusi” from the Batman 60’s tv show;

    When Homer’s having his epiphany/vision, he falls ‘though’ a representation of M.C. Escher’s famous staircase artwork. Later in the epiphany, as his body parts are ‘melting and hanging’ from the tree branches, he resembles Salvador Dali’s surrealistic painting “The Persistence of Time”;

    When Homer climbs up the ridge and looks down at the dome surrounded by EPA forces, the scene is a parody of a famous one in Spileberg’s “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”, as Roy Neary crests the Devil’s Tower and sees the landing area below;

    Homer, wearing a hotel-doorman’s uniform, is mistaken by the soldier as “General Marriott Suites. “Marriott Suites” is a Marriott Corp. owned chain of hotels, so the soldier was just reading the pinned-on corporate name and logo as a name-tag. (Homer’s to-do list end with “return uniform to doorman by 5”);

    When Cletus steps up to Barney, Lenny & Carl’s plot, there is a “Mission Impossible” musical sting;



    IMO

    Lots of great Wiggum – especially the “yard trimmings” line with Fat Tony;

    Too Bad Patty & Selma’s one brief scene was cut; no Skinner lines;

    Loved: the window-roll joke w/ Grampa, “Gay, gay. Gay” (w/ fingers crossed); Ned’s “paraplegino?”; “Bountiful penis!” “Amen!”;

    [Okay – enough IMO. Most of the world’s opinion is that it was generally awesome.]
    Last edited by Roger Myers III; 07-31-2007 at 05:58 AM.

  15. #315
    like kissin' a peanut
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    227


    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Myers III
    Okay, it’s been long enough. Can’t.. hold… back…


    DYN

    The film doesn’t really open “with an I&S cartoon” – rather it simulates this effect by having OFF watching an I&S cartoon in a movie theatre, and thereby setting up Homer’s opening meta-joke-on –the-audience. Also, notice the ‘film paradoxes’ being played with: the tv-series family is watching a film adaptation of their own cartoon-within-a-cartoon as they themselves make the transition to film, and that the I&S cartoon is displayed on ‘our’ screens in the ‘television’ aspect ratio (of 1.85:1), which then switches to the film-proper’s Cinemascope aspect ratio (2.35:1) when we switch perspectives to OFF in the theatre itself;
    The ratio for TVs is 4:3, unless you're talking about HDTVs. If they wanted the audience to think we were watching a "television," I think they would have made the I&S part in the 1.33:1 ratio.

  16. #316
    Apu Baby Gerald's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Ogdenville
    Posts
    71


    Skinner actually had one small line when he told the children to fire their arrows.
    "You know Skittle Brau"-My hero

  17. #317
    Stonecutter
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    England
    Posts
    3,530


    Thanks for the review Roger, it's clear you've put a lot of thought into that. And whilst I have your attention, do you whether or not, any of the writers will be returing to the show full time? (Vitti, Swartzwelder, Mirkin, Meyer etc).

  18. #318
    Hired Goon Adam R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    london
    Posts
    10,743


    Yay, a Veryjammy review! And also, I very much agree with it, although I don't feel quite as strongly. Great review from JM1878 too.

    RMIII, as for references, there was a scene in which Homer was arguing with himself, was this a reference to The Nutty Professor? It looked kinda similar and I saw someone claim it on IMDb.

    Quote Originally Posted by JM1878
    which is apparently semipermeable, so as to allow the town to breathe?
    I'm no scientist, but light can still get in so plants can photosynthesise, which produces the oxygen, right?

  19. #319
    Mod, eh? Tomacco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,876


    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Myers III
    Okay, it’s been long enough. Can’t.. hold… back…






    During the impending bombing, the churchgoers (the Lovejoys, Feesh, Miss Albright) run into to Moe's Tavern (having abandoned faith for drink) and Moe's drunkards (Moe, Barney, Larry, Sam, and Ruth Powers, flock to the church (abandoning drink and trying to find salvation before death);

    ...

    Homer again mangles “epiphany” as “epiphedry”;

    ...

    REF


    [Can someone give me the proper name of the song that was played as Homer daydreams about Plopper – I think its “For All of My Life”…]

    Wow, pretty dang comprehensive, I must say. A few teeny corrections:

    - The scene with the church/bar swap actually happened when the dome was first being put over Springfield.

    - Homer said "epipha-tree" actually, referring to the trees which were directing his thoughts in the right direction during his ephiphany earlier.

    - The song played during Homer's daydream is "So Happy Together" by The Turtles, as also heard in "Special Edna".
    Last edited by Tomacco; 07-31-2007 at 09:53 AM.

  20. #320
    Banned HappyPalooza_x's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Behind your Couch, USA
    Posts
    236


    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlandersMan
    You're both on crack.
    Well put.

  21. #321
    Profound Sadness Kiyosuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    10,781


    Great stuff RM, thanks a lot.

    Homer’s indignant insistence that the pig-crap silo was “not leaking! Its overflowing”… is a reference to the same quote from Michael Brown, in defending FEMA’s screwing up in the wake of Hurrican Katrina flooding New Orleans. (He defended his assessments of the dams and locks surrounding that city in these same words);
    Oh wow, that totally went below my radar.

    During the credits, they play the “Springfield Anthem”, a recorded-but-cut song, which is to the tune of “The Marseilles” – the French national anthem. Notable line celebrating the French from the lyrics: “Making love, wine and cheese / Roquefort, camembert and bries”;
    I really want to see whatever they did actually do for the anthem on the DVD, was it fully animated I wonder? Also I noticed the anthem we do get ends really abruptly.

    Martin’s inspired vengeance on the bullies is a great retort to the ‘opening credits’ scene with them;
    Heh, thats an understatement. More like a great retort of 18 years of abuse.

    Ralph blows bubbles against the dome, but when some pop in his face, he laments “Blowback!” and cries. (‘Blowback’ is a term meaning ‘the unexpected retaliation to a secret government operation – usually by the CIA, FBI, etc.)
    Really..? Heh, Ralph and his crazy random head.

  22. #322
    ricin beans gonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    south east london
    Posts
    4,973
    Blog Entries
    1


    Yeah nice work there Roger Myers III. There was alot of stuff in there that, when I saw it in the movie, thought the complete opposite.

  23. #323
    has a smack of ham to him. kid_presentable's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Springfield, Utah
    Posts
    932


    Do you guys ever wonder if RMIII is just...like, "The Simpsons" incarnate?


    Choke on your lies!!!

  24. #324
    I'm not your friend-o Cartoonnetwork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,787
    Blog Entries
    1


    I understand what Tomacco says. But then again I didn't find it smooth at all. It was smooth until they escape from the dome, but there Lisa's story especially, but also the pig subplot, are almost forgotten. Ok, Lisa's story has a "proper" resolution, but then again, it was a happy end. Everything was too happy and I share that concern with Veryjammy and others. It seemed a little cliche. I didn't want it to be extremely sad or something, but it seems that some stories could have been a little less predictable. This one in particular disappointed me, cause I loved the introduction. I think Lisa was more charming than she has ever had in a long time, but her story is, basically, she falls in love with a perfect boy and it ends. That's why I think the enviromental theme should be used again or something, even if they didn't want it to be the central theme, Lisa could have had something to do.

    I also think the movie was anything but subtle. I disagree with the people that said it was not funny. I think almost every joke was hilarious. Even the one with that government guy saying he has found the Simpsons when listening to the phonecalls. Yes, it was unsubtle satire. Almost all the government satire was really unsubtle. However, it was funny. Perhaps they should have kept some of those jokes and others should have been toned down, cause it was funny but at the same time everything seemed a little too loud and it kinda gets annoying after a while. Even when you can stop laughing. I don't know if that makes sense, but that's how I felt the two times I watched the flick.

    There were some aspects that were more subtle in their satire, especially the first jokes when they were to Alaska (Homer's line about America, for example) , but compared to the major plot points, they seemed irrelevant.

    And about the logic of the plot, well, I lend towards to Tomacco's opinion. I don't think everything has to have perfect logic. However there were some aspects that did annoy me, especially the sinkhole and the mutant. I found both quite more surreal than most of the things we usually see in the show, at least as major plot points. The sinkhole wasn't bad as a plot idea, but it seemed too "magical" as some people said. Even in the context of the movie, if you don't compare it with the series at all, it seems more surreal than the rest of the story. It reminds me of the kind of tricks they use in blockbuster movies way too much. Something to show some "impressive" animation or special effects.

    About Bart, I understand what people are saying, but seriously, considering other subplots, this one had an acceptable development. It was not the best of this kind of story they have ever done, but it was probably one of the better they have done in some time. I enjoyed how Bart was more sharp and jaded than he usually is these days and I can accept his alcoholism a lot more than him smoking reefer for not reason. The fact that gross lines like the one about the "world fattest fertilizer salesman" or "His big fat butt could shield us all" made me laugh was enough proof of Bart being in rare form in the movie.

    The ending to Bart and dome subplots I found it acceptable. They were not extremely original or emotional but they worked. I would compare both to some season 9 episodes like Simpson Tide. That episode had an action-movie like story and a subplot about father and son, and none of them were extremely new or emotional, but they were logic and entertaining.

    What people consider the main theme of the movie I don't know exactly why, but doesn't work for me so well. Maybe I've seen it too many times. Maybe Homer was a tad annoying. Maybe the opposite. For example it seems quite reasonable to me that he wouldn't be exactly excited with the idea of saving Springfield when they tried to kill him and his family, no matter how big was the problem Homer had provoked. Maybe it's just the fact I can't believe Marge saying she is not going to come back to Homer anymore, no matter how "sincere" her interpretation is. I don't know, but I didn't quite like this aspect so much. This "Homer has to learn his lesson" thing seems pretty much the same moral from all animated features. And the way he solved it, by coming back to Springfield and saving the day, was also the same. He didn't even have a dialogue with Marge, he just saved the day and kissed her. I would repeat I did like when he tried to help but can't help but failing. But then again it was a small aspect that didn't make the general story a lot more original. Compare this to, say, Homer using the inanimate carbon bar in DSH and people making a parade for the bar.

    Don't get me wrong. Overall I enjoyed the movie. I especially don't get why some people say it wasn't funny. It was hilarious from beginning to end. But that , and maybe characterization, were the "only" aspects that reminded me of classic era. There were several modern tendencies (like a certain lack of Burns, Smithers and SNPP in general...why can't we see Homer working there anymore?)

    But what annoyed me more than the modern tendencies was the "summer movie" effect that I was talking about. The cliches, the things that got changed cause "casual viewers wouldn't get it" and a certain use of action sequences+"FX" at some points. I don't know if I would include the unsubtle satire here cause I am unsure if that was a concession or deliberate cause they wanted it to be kind of "silly". Mirkin's style is sometimes a little like that.

    I think it was good, but it was not classic era material, neither it was Jean at his best. It was better than average Jean and it was funnier, but it was a little disappointing. It was a B or a B- but they were promising us an A+. And the fact that they couldn't produce an A+ even with all the effort they have put in it, I think it's a little sad. Not that I'm mad at them or anything, but I would have rather wait a couple of years more if that would have been useful to fix some things. Though I doubt it.
    Last edited by Cartoonnetwork; 07-31-2007 at 11:36 AM.
    My Simpsons homage!


    http://elblogderg.blogspot.com

  25. #325
    Banned HappyPalooza_x's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Behind your Couch, USA
    Posts
    236


    Quote Originally Posted by kid_presentable
    Do you guys ever wonder if RMIII is just...like, "The Simpsons" incarnate?
    Yes...it's almost as if he knows too much...

  26. #326
    Greasy Thug LisaFan17's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Springfield
    Posts
    450


    I gave it a 3.5--really, really good, but not brilliant. Some of the jokes, like the wrecking ball scene, were too whacky and Three-Stooges-esque to me. The Disney reference where the birds and deer help get Marge's and Homer's clothes off for sex [lol] was a bit too cute...like they tried to hard to be cute. Spiderpig\Harry Plopper was awesome, the pacing was as good as can be expected (it's hard to pace out a movie based on a 22-minute show!) The animation was crisp and clear, and I loved the "Bart the Daredevil" meta-joke with Springfield gorge. Funny, snappy, better than I expected but not as good as it could have been.
    ~Kristen~
    : http://darfurherald.wordpress.com/

    March's quote: "We come to honor Bloody Guts Murphy..."--Timothy Lovejoy

  27. #327


    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Meyers III
    DYN

    The film doesn’t really open “with an I&S cartoon” – rather it simulates this effect by having OFF watching an I&S cartoon in a movie theatre, and thereby setting up Homer’s opening meta-joke-on –the-audience. Also, notice the ‘film paradoxes’ being played with: the tv-series family is watching a film adaptation of their own cartoon-within-a-cartoon as they themselves make the transition to film, and that the I&S cartoon is displayed on ‘our’ screens in the ‘television’ aspect ratio (of 1.85:1), which then switches to the film-proper’s Cinemascope aspect ratio (2.35:1) when we switch perspectives to OFF in the theatre itself;
    Oh, gee thanks for explaining that one to me. I wouldn't have known otherwise.

    But seriously, RMIII, your lists are very comprehensive and you pretty much list and recap every scene from the movie. Some of it is insightful but I could just easily watch the movie again instead of reading it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cartoonnetwork
    The fact that gross lines like the one about the "world fattest fertilizer salesman" or "His big fat butt could shield us all" made me laugh was enough proof of Bart being in rare form in the movie.
    Yeah, I don't think we saw anything like retarded Bart being obsessed with a nickel rattling around in a bottle in this movie.

  28. #328


    Just a few thoughts, since everybody else has some.

    First of all, no matter what seeing the movie was great. To have a packed audience around you watching something 19 years in the making was one of the best movie experiences I ever had. The animation was so amazing and for us die-hard fans half the fun was just picking out the random characters (i almost jumped out of my seat when I saw Handsome Pete), and a classic church bulletin. In the long run there was a lot of great laughs, a good story and really just a wonderful Simpsons moment.

    For me the first half of the movie was great, just like watching an episode. So many classic setup jokes that failed (Homer through the roof), good use of side characters (Nelson losing his voice HaHaing) and it really just played out just like an episode would. The whole mob scene was excellent (especially Homer's chain saw) and even the 'adult' touches were funny (Homer flipping the town off was hysterical I don't care what anyone says).

    Now the second half played out a little more like most TV movies do. If you couldn't see what was going to happen, then you must have never watched one of these before. But it still worked ok in my opinion, it was still classic Simpsons. How many episodes just work out in the end? Who cares how Maggie knew to push a rock off, who cares what happened to Spider-Pig (or do we prefer Harry Plopper), so what if it isn't all wrapped up in a neat little package (in a sarcastic Homer voice). So many episodes start off going one direction and end somewhere on the other side of the map, so why shouldn't the movie?

    I will agree with Homer5000's review in that the ending did wrap up to fast, especially watching it a second time. Your thoughts would have played out perfect in my opinion, but once we see the deleted scene edition maybe those ideas will be in there.

    In the end it was worth all the waiting. Unfortunately I don't have anything to look forward to now. But the writers should be proud of it and us fans should be happy. There was no way to please everyone, but as someone else mentioned in the future as we see it more I think everyone is going to be pleased with the results.

  29. #329
    Profound Sadness Kiyosuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    10,781


    Quote Originally Posted by Cartoonnetwork
    For example it seems quite reasonable to me that he wouldn't be exactly excited with the idea of saving Springfield when they tried to kill him and his family, no matter how big was the problem Homer had provoked. Maybe it's just the fact I can't believe Marge saying she is not going to come back to Homer anymore, no matter how "sincere" her interpretation is.
    Someone talked about that first part elsewhere, and here's the thing. I think while its not unreasonable a claim for Homer to say its damn heartless and tacky. Thats the point, the point even the Inuit woman tries to make to him. Homer really did cause a lot of this to happen, and its not like the town didn't have anything to answer for either since they did cause a lot of the pollution themselves before Lisa stepped in and they all tried to stop it. But regardless progress was being made and Homer fucked it up just for free donuts, after all the warnings. Its a case of Homer thinking about nothing but himself.

    They could have selfishly stayed in Alaska, but Marge and the kids obviously still kinda liked the town, they didn't cause any of it to happen. She didn't want to just stand around and let it happen like Homer did because thats just heartless. Thats why I say the plot is about taking responsibility for your own actions. If the Springfielders had done that none of this would have happened, if Homer had done that none of this would have happened, and if Marge even had done that and not just blatantly ignore a lot of her husband's blatant stupidity maybe something could have been avoided.

    So yeah, its reasonable, but its wrong. Its running away from taking responsibility. That was the whole point of the Inuit womans induced dream, to slap into Homer's head the fact sometimes reasonable just isn't an excuse for being acting like an asshole. It was all about putting selfishness aside.

    If Homer hadn't taken responsiblity for his own actions, he really would have lost Marge and his family and would have lived a very very empty life. So while it could be all summed up as "learning a lesson", thats a general idea of a lot of stories. Whats important is the distinct lesson itself, and in this its to just actually take responsibility for your own mistakes and learn from them. If you're selfish and run away from that, you'll lose the people who maybe do care about you and then what good will you really be? Either that, or just simply listen to your wife/reason. It was going to work for Springfield if Homer had listened too.

  30. #330
    I'm not your friend-o Cartoonnetwork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,787
    Blog Entries
    1


    It normally doesn't happen when I have a different opinion about some episodes, but you guys and RM III posts are kinda convincing me that the movie was a little better than I thought. Not that I would change my grade a lot, but I am starting to think it was a little less disjointed and included more satire than I initially thought.

    I will come up with something to discuss about the emotional part later, cause I still don't think it was as good as I was expecting it to be. Give me some time...

    Probably it was because the movie was about going more far than usual with everything or something. More desperate situations. But I guess my concern was what other people mentioned. Townspeople didn't have their basic humanity, Homer was more stubborn than usual, Marge is so willing to abandon Homer that she even ruined their wedding video...it's kinda difficult to buy when you know everything is going to be alright at the end. Homer is unhappy with Springfield in You only move twice, but he doesn't wish they die. Then again Sprinfield didn't try to kill him. Also when the rest of the family told him they want to come back to Springfield he didn't yell at them and said his life in Cypress Creek was awesome (although it was and better than the one they have in Alaska).

    I know the situation in the movie was more extreme but it seemed that most characters were a little more mean or angry than usual. Even the way Marge abandons Homer in Alaska and without talking directly to him seems a little extreme when she had accepted to travel with him til there. She accepts that he is moronic enough to cause pollution and destroy a city, but not the fact that he is mean spirited and selfish. Which makes sense, but it's too much of a "moral lesson". And like I said I don't think Homer is usually like that either. He would probably be more scared to come back to Springfield than wishing other people deads and even if he were he would probably reconsider pretty soon when his family mention it. Here he was a little annoyed with Bart's attitude and that may be a reason why he was in a bad mood, but still. He didn't seem like that in TOMT or Homer Bad Man (to mention an episode in which everybody was against him).
    Last edited by Cartoonnetwork; 08-01-2007 at 03:27 AM.



Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

User Tag List

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •