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Thread: Why do people hate jerkass Homer so much?



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  1. #1
    Hercules Rockefeller Homer Samson's Avatar
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    Why do people hate jerkass Homer so much?

    I honestly can't help but love Jerkass Homer. Even in the Scully era I felt he was hilarious. I think people refuse to give a pass to Bart Star and Trash of the Titans is only because of Homer being a jerkass, despite the fact that ot made the episodes super funny. Some people even crap on Boy Scoutz n the Hood and Homer Goes to College for Homer being a jerkass. All I can say is that those 2 episodes define what made classic Simpsons so great and the people who call them some of the weaker episodes don't seem like true fans to me.


  2. #2


    I really like Homer Goes to College and Boy Scoutz n' the hood and I don't think they're the start of jerkass Homer.
    But I don't like Bart Star and Trash of the Titans so much. And although I agree that jerkass Homer has funny moments I don't particularly like him since he's often used to advance the plot in stupid ways. He is often the excuse to advance weak plots "let's make Homer do this thing because he's stupid". This often results in weak episodes with silly premises or wacky third acts.
    That's why I prefer the multifacetted Homer of the first 8 seasons.

    The Simpsons was supposed to be a satire of the family sitcoms of the 80's. Homer was initially a parody of the know it all dad that was so prevalent on TV at that time. But he was still a character who really cared about his family and was the representation of the common man. Trapped in a dead end job, he likes to watch tv, drink beer and be left alone.
    Jerkass Homer on the other hand is not a relatable character at all. He is not a representation of the common man anymore, he is an indestructible jerk that can do whatever he wants and face no consequences and who constantly endangers his family. He is no longer the lower middle class man whose job is so important to support his family. Modern Homer takes a new job all the time and is traveling to a new country every now and then.

    And the third point that I'd like to make is that Classic Simpsons had humour rooted in its characters. What Made it so special is that it wasn't just a bunch of cartoonish gags put together but that the humour and plot was rooted in each character's set of beliefs and personality. In a way it was a sitcom that happened to be a cartoon.
    On the other hand Jerkass Homer is often used for cartoonish gags, let's make Homer hurt himself or do something crazy. And as I said before, he is often used to advance non sensical plots.


  3. #3
    Junior Camper Frankbags's Avatar
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    I've had this discussion before..

    someone was saying that homer became meaner.. while I didn't disagree I felt like he was always mean.. he was an angrier man in the early seasons, he slowly became a lovable goof, but not being going through a jerk homer period.
    I'm not asking for angry dad back.. there was a period of time when his dialogue consisted mostly of screams of pain.

    For me to get into the angry homer, It has to come from a place of ignorance, of obliviousness, a perfect example of dunning-krueger.. I like to use "A Streetcar Named Marge" as an example of homer being a mean asshole... there's emotional investment in that episode, marital strife throughout and redemption in the end. Homer can be stupid, mean, angry but in the end he comes around.

  4. #4


    Scully era (and early Jean era) Homer is one of the most annoying characters in all of fiction. I can't fucking stand him. The fact that the later Jean era eventually managed to move the character away from that portrayal is one of the extremely few compliments I can actually give the later Jean era.

  5. #5
    Pixel Survivor BartArt's Avatar
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  6. #6
    Grotesque Nitsy's Avatar
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    I don’t dislike “Jerkass Homer” per se, but sometimes he is more jerky than funny, in which case I begin to dislike his characterization. Additionally, what I dislike the most is when Homer is a jerk but we’re supposed to sympathize with him and I’m just like “fuck that”. So it really depends on the episode.
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  7. #7


    After watching season 5, I can see Homer becoming more stupid and mean in some episodes, way before so called Scully era started

  8. #8


    Quote Originally Posted by Net View Post
    After watching season 5, I can see Homer becoming more stupid and mean in some episodes, way before so called Scully era started
    Season 5 is probably the most obnoxious and wackiest he has been during the Classic era but this was balanced with a brilliantly written humour and well rounded plots for the most part. Plus even when he was a jerk we weren't supposed to sympathize with him. He was portrayed as being clearly in the wrong and he usually learned a lesson.
    And this aspect of his personality was toned down in the next seasons anyways.

    Starting with season 9 though, this wacky and jerky side of his personality became prevalent and was used as an excuse for cartoonish gags or advancing the plot in stupid ways.
    And worst of all, he was not portrayed as being clearly in the wrong anymore. Now we were supposed to sympathize with him.

  9. #9
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    Homer became more mean, stupid and has been a psychopath. There were times he wants Ned dead and he shows no remorse not only to Ned but also his family and friends. I remembered some scenes he dreamed Ned and his boys were hunged, he smashed Neds' head on the door and he killed Abe. Even though that last one was in a dream this is not the Homer we know. He is now a monster and we are suppose to root for him? Not me. Marge should have divorced him a long time ago.

  10. #10
    I'm baaaack! Patches O'houlihan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homer Samson View Post
    I honestly can't help but love Jerkass Homer. Even in the Scully era I felt he was hilarious. I think people refuse to give a pass to Bart Star and Trash of the Titans is only because of Homer being a jerkass, despite the fact that ot made the episodes super funny. Some people even crap on Boy Scoutz n the Hood and Homer Goes to College for Homer being a jerkass. All I can say is that those 2 episodes define what made classic Simpsons so great and the people who call them some of the weaker episodes don't seem like true fans to me.
    The reason why jerk-ass Homer is hated is because it was the only thing Homer was after Scully changed his persona.

    Homer was never a really nice person, but he never was a total a****** 100% of the time either in the first eight seasons.

  11. #11
    Your typical fan Simpson's Fan's Avatar
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    I do not dislike jerkass Homer, rather than getting annoyed by him. I will demonstrate my point:

    The problem with Homer Simpson as a character is that the writers have difficulty in portraying Homer in a specific personality. They will make an episode, like "Barthood", a beautifully-paced parody of the movie Boyhood and have Homer being a neglectful, uninterested and hateful father to Bart, but later on in "How Lisa Got her Marge Back" they will portray Homer as being a kind and loving father that sometimes gets really annoyed by his son's antics. However, this totally contradicts his behaviour in most of the series' episodes where he strangles Bart to death and tries to blame him for everything wrong he does.

    This is a pretty major problem with the HD era of the show, because the writers do not seem to understand Homer as a character or any other character on the show. It is always the same, classic and tiring story of Homer being tempted to do something incredibly stupid for whatever reason, does something stupid and inconsiderate, tries to deny it by acting like a jerk and later on "realising" his mistake and reconciling with his family and by the time the next episode is being produced Homer is still an inconsiderate, manipulative jerk to the family, especially Bart and Marge. However, even this kind of plot isn't consistent, because when an episode like "How Lisa Got Her Marge Back" airs, Homer is acting like the greatest father in the world, even though he has destroyed the town of Springfield and his family in more than one occasion.

    The specific episode where Homer's newfound personality appears is debatable, but we did get a few glimpses of it in "Homer's Phobia" and "Trash Of The Titans", which seem to be the two most used examples when describing Homer's recent characterisation. Some people even suggest "Homer's enemy" as an example of "Homer being a jerk" episode, but the thing is: Homer was not intentionally acting the way he did, but rather behaving like his usual self when at work. Personally speaking, I find the defining moment of jerkass Homer being "Alone Again, Natura Diddly". I mean, in that particular episode, Maude Flanders, Ned's wife, dies a tragic death and Homer, instead of supporting his neighbourino and "friend", he just starts setting him up for a date. Many would say that this is how Homer normally acts, but the thing is that we can't have Homer doing this to Ned, since two episodes prior, he was trying to befriend him.

    To sum up, the problem is the writers not wanting to pick a specific personality for Homer and instead choose to have him and all the characters go along with the plot, instead of the characters leading the plot to a conclusion.

  12. #12
    paranormal investigator friz's Avatar
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    I was rewatching When Flanders Failed last night, and was surprised at how "season 12" Homer was being. If that episode had aired in 1999, it would be seen as one of the worst epiАв‚ома‚ин‚е€не‚ казино о„и†иалŒное зе€кало š€оме ‚ого, посе‚и‚елей по€адƒе‚ б‹с‚€ая п€о†едƒ€а €егис‚€а†ии, ко‚о€ая ‚€ебƒе‚ ‚олŒко ад€ес элек‚€онной п‹ и па€олŒ.šазино обеспе‡ивае‚ полŒзова‚елям незамедли‚елŒнƒŽ в‹пла‚ƒ ли‡н‹… с€едс‚в *ahem*, sorry, one of the worst episodes ever.
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  13. #13


    Why would anyone like Jerkass Homer? Hes a whiny prick who does whatever he wants, whenever he wants, with no underlying motivation. And on top of that, the world revolves around him and hes not held accountable for his actions. If that type of logic applied to someone in the real world, would you want to hang around him/her?

    Not to segway here, but I just want to say that Jerkass Homer is foreshadowed quite a bit in the episodes that Scully wrote in the classic era. A few episodes he wrote before he was showrunner depict him this way, but its balanced out by brilliant writing and satire, courtesy of those showrunners. I can only imagine Mirkins reaction to "Lisa on Ice" in the rewrite room.....

    Mirkin: this is great, Mike! I love how you amp up Homers personality to satirize overcompetitive parents living their dreams through their children.

    Scully: uhhh. yeahsatirize.


  14. #14


    Quote Originally Posted by 714MatchesFound View Post
    Why would anyone like Jerkass Homer? He’s a whiny prick who does whatever he wants, whenever he wants, with no underlying motivation. And on top of that, the world revolves around him and he’s not held accountable for his actions. If that type of logic applied to someone in the real world, would you want to hang around him/her?

    Not to segway here, but I just want to say that Jerkass Homer is foreshadowed quite a bit in the episodes that Scully wrote in the classic era. A few episodes he wrote before he was showrunner depict him this way, but it’s balanced out by brilliant writing and satire, courtesy of those showrunners. I can only imagine Mirkin’s reaction to "Lisa on Ice" in the rewrite room.....

    Mirkin: this is great, Mike! I love how you amp up Homer’s personality to satirize overcompetitive parents living their dreams through their children.

    Scully: uhhh…. yeah……satirize…….
    Mike was well respected as a writer and everyone said he was a very funny guy, so I don't doubt that.

    The problem was his lack of vision for the show. Just like a good player doesn't always become a good coach, in the same vein a good writer isn't always a good showrunner.
    Mike Scully didn't have the same clear vision of what he wanted the show to be unlike previous showrunners. I think he had only a vague idea. Unlike Oakley and Weinstein that looked up to the era of Al Jean and Mike Reiss as showrunners, I think it's clear that Scully was more influenced by David Mirkin and attempted something in the same vein.
    The problem was that in the process he forgot about the core principles that made the show great. These core principles were mainly: rebellious satire, humour rooted in its characters, realism and heart.
    These principles had been established since the first era of the show when Matt Groening, Sam Simon and James L Brooks were showrunners. And since then it had always been respected, yes it was stretched out at times, above all in the Mirkin era, but they were never broken and were always present when writing for the Simpsons.

    If you watch the interview with Conan O'Brien and the other writers of the show there's a moment when Conan himself says that when he entered the writing team he was told "hey, the Simpsons are a family that care about each other, etc" and Conan was like "yeah whatever" but after some time working in the writing team he realized that these principles were what made the show so special.
    These core principles seemed to be very important and omnipresent in the writing team to the point that every new writer was reminded of them.

    When Mike Scully came to be showrunner these principles were abandoned for the first time though. The show slowly became a string of cartoonish gags instead of having humour rooted in its characters, Homer became an unlikable jerk instead of a dim witted but loving father, the realism was completely abandoned, now you had episodes in which Burns hunted the Loch Ness monster or Homer competed against jockey elves and the rebellious satire was replaced with celebrity worship, one of the things that Al Jean not only never corrected but made it worse.


  15. #15


    Quote Originally Posted by ManuelMaiden95 View Post
    Mike was well respected as a writer and everyone said he was a very funny guy, so I don't doubt that.

    The problem was his lack of vision for the show. Just like a good player doesn't always become a good coach, in the same vein a good writer isn't always a good showrunner.
    Mike Scully didn't have the same clear vision of what he wanted the show to be unlike previous showrunners. I think he had only a vague idea. Unlike Oakley and Weinstein that looked up to the era of Al Jean and Mike Reiss as showrunners, I think it's clear that Scully was more influenced by David Mirkin and attempted something in the same vein.
    The problem was that in the process he forgot about the core principles that made the show great. These core principles were mainly: rebellious satire, humour rooted in its characters, realism and heart.
    These principles had been established since the first era of the show when Matt Groening, Sam Simon and James L Brooks were showrunners. And since then it had always been respected, yes it was stretched out at times, above all in the Mirkin era, but they were never broken and were always present when writing for the Simpsons.

    If you watch the interview with Conan O'Brien and the other writers of the show there's a moment when Conan himself says that when he entered the writing team he was told "hey, the Simpsons are a family that care about each other, etc" and Conan was like "yeah whatever" but after some time working in the writing team he realized that these principles were what made the show so special.
    These core principles seemed to be very important and omnipresent in the writing team to the point that every new writer was reminded of them.

    When Mike Scully came to be showrunner these principles were abandoned for the first time though. The show slowly became a string of cartoonish gags instead of having humour rooted in its characters, Homer became an unlikable jerk instead of a dim witted but loving father, the realism was completely abandoned, now you had episodes in which Burns hunted the Loch Ness monster or Homer competed against jockey elves and the rebellious satire was replaced with celebrity worship, one of the things that Al Jean not only never corrected but made it worse.
    I agree with everything you say here. And I saw that serious jibber jabber video with Conan and the original writers too. It was a bit awkward when Jay Kogen says "when the show was at its height....well....it's still at it's height" because Al Jean was right there.

    As for Mike Scully, well.... is the anti-Sam Simon. Simon is often credited as the one who built the world of Springfield, set the show's ton and balance, and made sure that the comedy was rooted in its characters. Scully tore that all apart. He deconstructed Springfield to the point where logic was thrown out the window, and characters became flanderized and/or permanently altered (Flanders, Apu). The show's tone also became more mean-spirited and plot/gag-driven.

    I bet Mike Scully is a nice guy. He certainly comes off that way from interviews I've heard, but I have a weird theory. Since Homer is his favorite character, and he's a huge fan of Homer getting hurt and being mean for no reason, I almost believe Jerkass Homer is Scully's avatar, the character who represents his real life self or who he wants to be. Like how George Costanza is Larry David, or Brian Griffin is Seth MacFarlane, or Kermit the Frog is Jim Henson. It's far-fetched I know, but wouldn't it crazy if that was the case?

    Ultimately, there are as many reasons for the show's decline as there are for why it was acclaimed in the first place. Scully isn't responsible for every reason for the former, but he contributed way more to it than he should've.
    Last edited by 714MatchesFound; 06-06-2020 at 01:34 PM.

  16. #16
    My brain... OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    Mike Scully wants to be Jerkass Homer? I don't follow that logic. He might find that version of the character funnier, but since Homer was never based on Scully himself in the first place I think that's highly implausible.
    George Costanza and Brian Griffin (nowadays at least) are self-deprecating parodies of their creators as well, so I don't think they actually strive to be like their characters either.
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