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    Exclamation New WGA Strike 2020?

    WGA Members Overwhelmingly Approve “Pattern Of Demands” For Contract Talks That Could Spark Industry’s First Strike Since 2008
    WGA members have voted overwhelmingly to approve a pattern of demands for the guild’s upcoming negotiations with management’s AMPTP for a new film and TV contract. The vote was 3,028 (91%) who voted yes and 308 (9%) who voted no. By comparison, in 2017, 1,626 members voted: 1,557 voted yes (96%) and 69 (4%) voted no.

    It’s also in line with the vote on the guild’s pattern of demands that ultimately lead to its 100-day strike in 2007-08, when 96% of the members voted to approve the demands.

    One of WGA’s demands would “require signatory companies to negotiate only with agents franchised by the WGA.” That could spark a strike come May 1, when the guild’s current contract expires, because it seeks to drag the major studios and production companies into the guild’s 10-month battle with Hollywood’s major talent agencies. The AMPTP flatly rejected a similar proposal last March when the guild, seeking to reopen contract negotiations, asked the companies to participate in what the AMPTP called a “group boycott” of talent agencies that refused to sign the WGA’s new Agency Code of Conduct, which banned packaging fees and agency affiliations with corporately related production entities.

    Doing so would subject the companies to “a substantial risk of liability for antitrust violation,” AMPTP president Carol Lombardini said in a letter last March to WGA West executive director David Young. A month later, the WGA ordered all of its members to fire their agents who refused to sign the code, and days later, the guild filed an antitrust lawsuit against several of the biggest agencies, which in turn filed suit against the guild, claiming that it was engaged in an “unlawful group boycott.”

    WGA West president David A. Goodman and WGA East president Beau Willimon told guild members last week that the pattern of demands was “unanimously recommended by our Negotiating Committee, and by the governing bodies of both Guilds: the WGA West’s Board of Directors and the WGA East’s Council.”

    “The 2020 Minimum Basic Agreement negotiations will take place in the context of an expanding media industry that is experiencing record profits,” they told their members today. “The broad goal of our negotiating committee will be to build on the gains achieved in past contracts, and to ensure that writers receive their fair share of the proceeds generated by the content they create.”

    No date has been set yet for the start of negotiations, but they won’t start until the Directors Guild wraps its negotiations with the AMPTP, which get underway Monday. The two guild presidents also said that “Members will have a chance to give feedback to the Negotiating Committee about approach and priorities during member meetings in March.”

    The WGA’s pattern of demands also includes increases in writer compensation and residuals, particularly in new media, as well as larger contributions by the companies to the guild’s pension and health fund. Here is the pattern of demands that have now been approved by the guild’s members:

    COMPENSATION AND RESIDUALS
    • Increase minimum compensation in all areas.
    • Expand made-for new media programs subject to MBA minimums.
    • Address issues for writing teams.
    • Address inequities in compensation.
    • Enhance protections against uncompensated work.
    • Improve residuals for reuse markets.

    PENSION PLAN AND HEALTH FUND
    • Increase contributions to the Pension Plan and Health Fund.

    PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS AND EMPLOYMENT PROTECTIONS
    • Strengthen protections for screenwriters.
    • Strengthen protections for comedy-variety writers.
    • Strengthen protections for writers employed and compensated on per episode basis.
    • Provide for paid family leave for writers.
    • Enact anti-discrimination measures, including the prevention of harassment and promotion of pay equity.
    • Require signatory companies to negotiate only with agents franchised by the WGA.
    • Modify and expand all arbitrator lists.
    Actually, I've read about this on one Ukrainian (my native) source, which reffered to Deadline. Also it included one more sentence, which I didn't see in Deadline. I translated it (very sorry, if it's not very relevant, again I've found out this only today)
    Sources at Netflix, HBO, CBS and Showtime report that they are now accelerating their work and collecting material for the future season by the end of April.
    So, should we worry?
    IMHO the best and the worst episodes of each season (in bold — the best and worst of overall series, upd. 03/08/20):
    1. Moaning Lisa/Some Enchanted Evening 2. Bart vs. Thanksgiving/Itchy & Scratchy & Marge 3. Mr. Lisa Goes to Washington/The Otto Show 4. Homer’s Triple Bypass/Selma’s Choice 5. Secrets of a Successful Marriage/Homer the Vigilante 6. Two Dozen and One Greyhounds/Lisa’s Rival 7. Home Sweet Homediddly-Dum-Doodily/Homerpalooza 8. My Sister, My Sitter/The Homer They Fall 9. Miracle on Evergreen Terrace/Bart Star 10. Wild Barts Can’t Be Broken/Monty Can’t Buy Me Love 11. Days of Wine and D’oh’ses/Pygmoelian 12. Homer vs. Dignity/New Kids on the Blecch 13. Poppa’s Got a Brand New Badge/Weekend at Burnsie’s 14. Moe Baby Blues/Helter Shelter 15. Fraudcast News/Co-Dependent’s Day 16. Goo Goo Gai Pan/A Star Is Torn 17. Bonfire of the Manatees/Kiss Kiss, Bang Bangalore 18. 24 Minutes/Stop, Or My Dog Will Shoot! 19. Eternal Moonshine of the Simpson Mind/Husbands and Knives 20. Coming to Homerica/Four Great Women and a Manicure 21. The Squirt and the Whale/Treehouse of Horror XX 22. The Blue and the Gray/Elementary School Musical 23. A Totally Fun Thing That Bart Will Never Do Again/Moe Goes from Rags to Riches 24. Hardly Kirk-ing/Gorgeous Grampa 25. Brick Like Me/What to Expect When Bart’s Expecting 26. Sky Police/Treehouse of Horror XXV 27. Halloween of Horror/Treehouse of Horror XXVI 28. 22 for 30/Havana Wild Weekend 29. Flanders’ Ladder/Springfield Splendor 30. Baby You Can’t Drive My Car/The Clown Stays in the Picture 31. TBA/TBA
    The Simpsons season ratings:
    1 > 2 > 4 > 7 > 3 > 6 > 8 > 5 > 27 > 21 > 9 > 20 > 25 > 17 > 29 > 10 > 12 > 15 > 26 > 24 > 13 > 18 > 14 > 19 > 28 > 16 > 30 > 23 > 11 > 22

    I think that thoughts may differ, because so many people, so many opinions.

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    Were there major delays back then too? I don't actually remember.

    I suppose it'd depend on whether individual companies' actions matter, if I'm not mistaken a few of the crew's higher-ups are pro WGA so they might be alright.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venomrabbit View Post
    Were there major delays back then too? I don't actually remember.
    Animated shows weren't "visably" affected by the previous strike, because of the amount of time that goes by between when an episode is written and when it airs. The strike ended by the time the writers of The Simpsons really needed to start working on new episodes.

    The only real effect it may have had is, when an episode returned from Asia and had to be cut for time, if that happened during the strike, none of the WGA members could do it as WGA considers any editing of dialogue "writing" and it had a strict "pencils down" policy during the strike. I remember hearing on one of the American Dad! commentary tracks that they had to get somebody else to edit those episodes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by That Don Guy View Post
    Animated shows weren't "visably" affected by the previous strike, because of the amount of time that goes by between when an episode is written and when it airs. The strike ended by the time the writers of The Simpsons really needed to start working on new episodes.

    The only real effect it may have had is, when an episode returned from Asia and had to be cut for time, if that happened during the strike, none of the WGA members could do it as WGA considers any editing of dialogue "writing" and it had a strict "pencils down" policy during the strike. I remember hearing on one of the American Dad! commentary tracks that they had to get somebody else to edit those episodes.
    The thing is the previous strike started around November. At that point, season 19 was mostly written. All 22 scripts were in some stage of production. The strike ending early in 2008 meant season 20 started story conferences around that period. So, they only lost two episodes, plus some season 19 holdovers into season 20 that didn't get the same level of rewriting as other episodes.

    If a strike were to happen in May, it would cut directly into season 32's production, essentially stopping the season cold. They wouldn't even be able to rewrite the episodes already in the can. It would cost the show far more.

    But I think the chances of a strike right now are slim. It's a different environment with different stakes.



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