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  1. #61
    vs. Radioactive Man Captain Squid's Avatar
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    I've always loved the full page fake outs from the old Simpsons comics! Like, I recall one where it looked like a character's head was about to be chopped off by a guillotine and it turned out they were just sticking their head through a service window for an office that was about to close.
    UP AND ATOM!


  2. #62
    The Blue Files OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    Yeah, I love those! One of my favorites is in #12 where Kent is basically acting like it's the end of the world, and then it's just his divorce! There's also a great one where Lisa and Bart look terrified, but really are just dying with laughter.
    Quote Originally Posted by scully apologist;bt39949
    "KONY 2012"

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Squid View Post
    I've always loved the full page fake outs from the old Simpsons comics! Like, I recall one where it looked like a character's head was about to be chopped off by a guillotine and it turned out they were just sticking their head through a service window for an office that was about to close.
    Yep; they kind of remind me of how "Rugrats" episodes would start with some kind of weird close-up and you can't really tell what it is at first, until it zooms out...

  4. #64
    vs. Radioactive Man Captain Squid's Avatar
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    I always found it very weird that issue #1 was basically a THOH story with Homer growing large.

    Man, the early Simpsons comics were so damn good. They had such a fun thing going with the Bartman spin-off and the Radioactive Man comics. I liked how early Simpsons comics had sort of their own thing going separate from the show, sort of like how the old Disney comics had a greater focus on Donald and his friends and family while the cartoons were mainly Mickey and Goofy and Donald. I also enjoyed how they brought back one off characters and expanded on them, and were not afraid to get a little weird (like issue 1 and the big crossover event).

    At what point did Bongo comics devolve into more of a kid's comic targeting the Archie crowd?

  5. #65
    The Blue Files OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    I think it's after issue 186 that at least Simpsons Comics started going downhill. Issue 187, 189 and 190 were all freakin' internet stories. The first was funny enough, but the latter two were just stupid. I usually love Ty Templeton, but he went out with a real whimper. Maggie as an internet phenomenon?! No. Just no.
    Then, Nathan Kane replaced Bill Morrison as editor starting with 192, and the comic hasn't been the same since then. Even Ian Boothby has gotten lazier.

  6. #66
    Intergalactic Mod Mr. Teenie's Avatar
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    Good review. The comics were usually very creative and always managed to stay true to the characters. You can definitely tell they were written by fans of the show. Sometimes, I'll read an older issue and think "How did the actual show writers not come up with this idea?"

  7. #67
    Stonecutter ComicBookGal's Avatar
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    I had no idea you have been doing something like this

  8. #68
    Stonecutter ComicBookGal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldSchoolerSimpsons View Post
    I think it's after issue 186 that at least Simpsons Comics started going downhill. Issue 187, 189 and 190 were all freakin' internet stories. The first was funny enough, but the latter two were just stupid. I usually love Ty Templeton, but he went out with a real whimper. Maggie as an internet phenomenon?! No. Just no.
    Then, Nathan Kane replaced Bill Morrison as editor starting with 192, and the comic hasn't been the same since then. Even Ian Boothby has gotten lazier.
    I can kind of see what you mean, after a recent book market trip, I had gotten what I think is issue #213 (spoiler alert, turns out Rex Banner survived that catapult trip and boy is he kind of butthurt) and yeah it's not as risky as the other issues were

  9. #69
    Stonecutter ComicBookGal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldSchoolerSimpsons View Post
    Homer Beats The Heat 8/10

    + Homer thinks the reason Lisa's sweating is because she was chased by "a scary mailman".
    + "I'm not gonna let some stupid ball of fire in the sky or the post office ruin my daughter's summer!"
    + Homer's going to show Lisa how to be coo- sorry I mean, keep cool. Stupid Homer.
    + While Homer's advice of putting ice cubes in a pocket isn't a half-bad idea, Lisa... doesn't have pockets. I saw this as a pretty amusing meta-joke concerning something people rarely have thought about.
    + Homer thinks of the idea to live in the power plant... but Lisa poke holes at his plan when she mentions how the rest of her family won't have anywhere to sleep.
    + "Y'know Lisa, it's easy to criticize, but it's so hard to come up with reasons I'm right." This almost feels like straight out of the show, doesn't it?
    + Homer "borrows" Kent's pool... in the middle of the night. Only to be confronted by him armed to the teeth.
    - One of Homer's ideas to keep cool is having dinner under the sprinklers. Eh. Weak joke.
    + Another one is a giant fan. This actually would a good idea if the car wasn't in the way to blow away and he and Lisa... Okay, maybe it wasn't a good idea after all.
    + Homer takes Lisa to the retirement castle. "There's nothing more chilly than the hand of death" is his reasoning." I, uuuhm... suppose? Either way, this is one of the best jokes in the comic.
    # Homer tells Lisa she should give him credit for trying. Pretty ironic, since he himself once gave her the lesson "Never try."
    ++ When Lisa complains about Homer stealing Flanders' air conditioner, Homer (angrily) suggests she buys one herself. "But I'm only eight years old." "That's your answer for anything."
    ++ This is a joke so hilarious I had to show you a frame of it! This is probably Homer's worst idea yet to try and make Lisa feel warmer...

    + They doze off because of the toxic fumes and end up at the hospital. Well since they are being cooled, I guess Homer... succeeded?
    ? What does Marge mean with "We're still apologizing to Walt Disney's family"?

    While Summer Shindig is one of my least favorite Bongo offerings, they do still have some good stories in it. This is one of them. The concept gleefully allows creative ways to show Homer screwing something up and it's pretty fun to watch. While only two of the jokes are absolutely hilarious, there was pretty good dialogue and several good absurd situations. Some solid Homer/Lisa banter has been missing a long time on the show, but I'm glad to see it in the comics at least.
    What I like is that even though he failed at almost every idea he came up with, Homer was still being a nice caring father. If he hadn't put his heart into it, he wouldn't have gone such a long way to help Lisa cool off.
    This is hardly an amazing story, most of the shorter ones never really get a 9 or 10 from me. But it's recommendable.
    really you don't get the last joke in the issue? there is a myth that Disney had himself frozen after he died, which of course is not true he got cremated

  10. #70
    Stonecutter ComicBookGal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiley207 View Post
    Yep; they kind of remind me of how "Rugrats" episodes would start with some kind of weird close-up and you can't really tell what it is at first, until it zooms out...
    okay to be fair the earlier episodes of the simpsons were done by the same people that did Rugrats, so I guess the Simpsons Comics people drew inspiration from that

  11. #71
    Stonecutter AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Negative Ned View Post
    Sometimes, I'll read an older issue and think "How did the actual show writers not come up with this idea?"
    I remember there was a Simpsons comic about Homer becoming smart in an experiment that came out way before the episode HOMR did (and the comic story was honestly much better, since it was about Homer bonding with Lisa and wanting to stay smart for her and actually showing the rest of the family reacting to the new Homer, while the episode just has Homer being obnoxious for ten minutes until everyone hates him and he goes back to normal, with some scenes with Lisa put in and the rest of the family mysteriously disappears for some reason).

    Also, I'm pretty sure the comics did an Orange is the New Black parody before the show did.

  12. #72
    Stonecutter ComicBookGal's Avatar
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    yeah almost like a sneak peak at future episodes

  13. #73
    The Blue Files OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    I didn't think the issue with Marge in jail was good either (some dumb jokes with Homer as a woman, and Rogers tried too much to be like Boothby), but it was still a thousand times better than the awful, awful Orange Is The New Yellow. As bland as the comics are now, they are at least a decent way of passing the time.

    About the comics, why do they keep re-using the same writers and artists? Aside of the rare Eric Rogers or James W. Bates story, it's almost always Ian Boothby, Max Davison and Tom Gammill. Where's Chuck Dixon? Where's Ty Templeton? As for the artists... Look, I love Phil Ortiz and Mike DeCarlo. But there are other ones out there! What happened to (once again) Ty Templeton? And Howard Shum? Heck, I even miss John Costanza. A lot of my favorites are gone.
    Last edited by OldSchoolerSimpsons; 07-13-2016 at 04:18 AM.

  14. #74
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    Yeah, and Bill Morrison doesn't draw much for the comics anymore. Though I will admit I do enjoy Mike Kazaleh's work in the comics. I really liked his "Futurama" and "Ren & Stimpy" work, like this...


    I'm surprised Ian Boothby hasn't written an episode of the Simpsons yet! I think he'd probably be able to come up with a decent episode.

  15. #75
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    Do the one where Willie makes sweet love with an emu.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerkass Homer View Post
    I guess this is the same Nicholson who did Joker in the Batman 1989 movie.

  16. #76
    Stonecutter ComicBookGal's Avatar
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    will we ever see another review of the comics?

  17. #77
    The Blue Files OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    Simpsons Comics #238



    Bad Boy Homer 7.5/10



    ? Why is Homer reading a magazine about cats? That seems bit unlike him.
    - It's pretty ridiculous how it now is Homer's birthday. Keep the canon at least a *little* controlled!
    + Marge amusingly comments he was very stimulating back when he was young. You dirty dog.
    + She says Homer shouldn't care if people think he's boring. Which, going through a new middle-life crisis, doesn't work of course!
    + I like that exterminating rats is Moe's idea of a fun night.
    - Uber driver parody name is fuber driver. Come on what is this, a Jean episode?
    # A car arrives, but not the right one... Homer doesn't get that though, so we are up for some mayhem!
    + Gil turns out to be the one who would drive Homer. But aaaw, he's too late.
    # Otto picks up some weird, uh... friends.
    + Oh shit, a girl who came with them is presumed dead by one of them, haha.
    + I really like Homer's expression here:



    - Homer saying "Jebus" as a running gag really isn't that funny.
    # Now they're gonna bury the body, but OH! The girl is... alive?
    + She makes a good point that the guys didn't even check if she was breathing.
    + Fat Tony makes a nice small cameo. It turns out he's Sofia's (that's her name) uncle.
    Fat Tony's cold comment: "Thanks for the hole, boys!"
    + Homer then wants to do something crazy with his bar pals, but they quickly end up bord and fall asleep at a fastfood resturant.
    # They are also thrown into jail after the waitress is unhappy over them sleeping there like "a bunch of bums". Marge bails Homer out, but isn't mad this time. She's proud he's such a BAD BOY!

    --- But this is where it gets ridiculous. Marge is horny because he was so wild, and then just asks what he did. He's too tired to answer and falls asleep. She suddenly regrets paying bail for him and gets him sent back to jail?! God, this ending fucking sucks.


    It's a fairly all right story. Not outstanding considering this is the first time Bill Morrison writes for Bongo in years, but has its fair share of good moments to keep me entertained. The ending however really got on my nerves. Why did they have to make Marge into a complete dick? It was also very convoluted, and it made no sense for her to react that way.

    Artwise, it's fine. I'm not a fan of Mike Kazaleh (his new style anyway), but this time he wasn't so bad. Homer's Ullman design is still solid to see, and his sharp drawings fit the sillyminded tone. But it has its usual Kazaleh flaws, such as bad character designs. How he drew the girl was kinda jarring and distracted me whenever her wide mouth opened.

    A fun, quick read for what it is.


    Scratchman & Itchin' in Origin Of The Scratch Signal 6/10



    In a Batman & Robin parody (well, not the movie, the characters), Itchy and Scratchy are climbing up a building.

    + Itchy cuts off the role. Amusing violence follows.

    It's okay. I usually don't care for the Dean Rankine shorties.


    Donuts Of Destiny 8.3/10



    + Ha, Homer is late to work because not only he overslept or stayed at Moe's, but played strip poker as well.
    # Homer has two donuts to choose between, but can't pick one. So he starts using his imagination to see what happens if he...

    + ... eats the pink donut. But he starts to dream about Bigfoot and Nessie at first. Bigfoot reminds him to dream about something else. Homer's comment on how he keeps him grounded is very funny.
    # Homer eats the pink donut and sets off the sprinkler system.
    + Lenny and Carl have started a diet which means no sweets. Lenny is hilariously bad at lying he's going to the bathroom and not the breakroom. Homer crashes through.
    ++ I love Carl and Lenny's comments when a disaster erupts.
    # I forgot to mention this earlier, but there's a running gag where poor Nessie doesn't get the respect he deserves.
    # Homer eats the brown donut. So far, so good. Until Lenny eats the pink donut and sets off the sprinkler system himself.
    + Carl not believing him because he said he washed his shirt is pretty odd, but pretty amusing.
    + Homer still thinks this dream was more successful since he didn’t stain his shirt this time.
    + Homer "saves" Lenny's life when he's about to eat the donut in real life. He tells Bigfoot warned him. Lenny funnily counters with how he watched a documentary questioning how Bigfoot would be real. Using big words Homer don't understand. I now know what cryptozoology is.
    + Lenny has a brief heartwarming moment with Carl where he compliments him for stopping him.
    + 1/2 Homer got to eat both donuts and he also makes Nessie feel appreciated. But best of all, Nessie suggests they now torch all the vegetables around them, haha.

    Very creative, simple and funny. Having a dream scenario type of plot where it's explored what happens if Homer just makes a slightly different choice was a magnificent idea. The jokes felt fresh, I even laughed at at a few of them, and any negatives are not to be found.

    Finally with this one the art is actually great. Phil Ortiz is one of the best pencillers still working at Bongo, and his facial expressions for the characters are still spot-on in pretty much every frame. Mike Rote also makes for a good combo, not to mention Art Villanueva makes it very nice to look at with his vivid colors and fitting use of shadows.

    They saved the best for last. This one shows that there is still some life left into Simpsons Comics after all.

    OVERALL RATING: 7.8/10
    Last edited by OldSchoolerSimpsons; 06-07-2017 at 01:48 PM.

  18. #78
    Stonecutter ComicBookGal's Avatar
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    we at least this thread was brought back from the dead even though I don't have that issue

  19. #79
    The Blue Files OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    Simpsons Comics #240


    The family is having a lot of fun on this cover. But will the reader?

    These reviews are very hard to write. Very hard. Even more so than the ones for regular Simpsons episodes actually, so this time the format is going to be a little more lax. Just like number 238, this issue has three stories. Are they as good as last time? Let's find out.

    Outside The Lines 5.5/10



    We start off with the family going to a book shop called Book Buffet. Naturally Lisa is excited while Homer isn't. A very archetypical setup. Homer finds a coloring book and finds himself occupied with it all the time. There are some decent jokes, like Moe getting mad at Homer when he both rejects beer and calls a stream of water "brook" instead of "creek". It's such an odd hang-up I find it amusing. Kinda like when Homer in some moments seem to know big words. Lisa talking to Homer about kids who got "hooked" on coloring was a bit odd and it's pretty out-of-character for her to be apprehensive of someone doing something creative, but the way that she stares at him and how she pulls him closer to her in a warning manner makes it kinda work. Homer then falls sleep and we are put into the world of the coloring book...
    That's when the problems start however. While I like the idea, the humor becomes uncharacterically simple and how should I say... very kiddish? The rat God ordering Homer to correct the mistakes he's made coloring (which prohibits things from working properly) and saying he can go to the nearest store and find a pencil sharpener just isn't funny. What am I supposed to laugh at, that it's odd for a tyrannical king to say that? The thing about how things don't really work unless colored or colored correctly is weird as well, since everything we see demonstrates that's not the case. If everything really has to be colored, how come the dragon they encounter can try to attack them with no problem? Also, the fox at first says he can only move on colored areas, but it turns out that's not the case. Homer also colors a liane, but since what we've seen has shown he actually doesn't have to color anything, it's just confusing. The plot makes no sense. What we can conclude is that bad coloring does affect how things work (we see the porcupine unable to enter his house), but that a lack of color would just doesn't ring true. The final fight between Homer and the rat king as he wakes up is nothing special, and once again the execution feels I'm reading something for little kids.
    The strongest point is actually the artwork. While I'm by means a huge fan of Jacob Chabot, he seems to try a lot more this time. The drawings are creative and the backgrounds in their non-colored glory actually look kinda cool. It's just too bad it's wasted on a nonsensical and weird story.
    The fox that Homer befriends is an okay character, even though he's part of the plothole I mentioned earlier.

    Just An Ordinary Day 6.7/10



    The next story is an improvement. We see the family going through their everyday routines through the perspective of Marge, delivered in a mundane/wacky manner. The two tones meet each other pretty well, and the seemingly ordinary story is executed pretty decently. It's also an interesting idea to show it from the perspective of one family member, which means the otherwise obligatory scene with Homer at Moe's is avoided. Instead we see him rather amusingly ramble drunkenly when he comes home and make Marge lose her sleep. There is nothing outstanding about the jokes, but the writing is overall acceptable. Lisa gleefully borrowing a drove of books from the library and talking endlessly about school to where her text gets drowned out are pretty good little jokes.
    As for the art, it's okay. He always draws Homer like in the shorts, which I like. Mike Kazaleh used to annoy me at first since I couldn't stand the sketchy way he drew the characters, but I've gotten a bit used to it later on. He draws them better than Jacob Chabot at least, who always gives them heads like POP! figurines and offputting teeth. Alan Hellard returns to Bongo Comics to color this issue, after a long absence. He usually worked on Bart Simpson comics, can't recall if he worked on this magazine before or not. Either way, he does a fine job. But something about the drawings still irk me, and I'll explain why. I feel like if they'd used Phil Ortiz, most of the visual jokes would work much better. He always knows how to bring some life even to the dullest story, and for example the scene where Homer is running to work doesn't look as funny as it would if Ortiz had drawn it. Even though I said the drawings were okay, they needed to be more than okay in order to wring out the comedy juice. This is certainly the most notable weakness. And when it comes to the jokes, not all of them land. My least favorite is probably the one where Ralph Wiggum's getting eaten by a snake. Even in the comics he's still a pretty lame character nowadays.

    Mob Rule 7/10



    The final story is a 2-pager one, as always drawn by Dean Rankine. The set-up is simple: Springfield forms an angry mob again, but this time they have no idea what they are protesting. Moe diverting everyone's attention to make them go to his bar and drink is handled cleverly, with him speaking in their place and pretending that's their opinions. It's amusing enough, a solid use of Moe.

    Meh. This was a pretty tepid issue. The first story is unquestionably my least favorite, since it doesn't feel very much like The Simpsons. It's written by Michael Saikin, who I would prefer did not return to Simpsons Comics anytime soon. The backgrounds and the world of the coloring book look pretty nice. However, the Simpsons characters are not particularly welldrawn. But that could have been forgiven if the jokes were good. They aren't.
    The second story is better, since the jokes have more effort put into them, and it's an interesting idea seeing the family's daily routines through the eyes of Marge. She's likable and you feel the typical struggles she has to go through with. The art doesn't compliment the writing since it's not fluid or creative enough, but even so it's not that bad of a story. Terry Delegeane might not be an amazing writer, but it's half-decent.
    The third story is surprisingly the best one, even though it's very brief. There's no time for failure, it's straight-to-the-point and gives you a good chuckle. Nathan Kane inserting an ad for the digital-exclusive Moe comic however is disgusting. Shame on you Bongo, don't ruin my enjoyment by promoting your crappy digital only policy.

    This is one of my least favorite issues of Simpsons Comics. It's not particularly bad, but the semi-poor quality of Outside The Lines doesn't make it rise above okay.

    OVERALL RATING: 6/10
    Last edited by OldSchoolerSimpsons; 02-01-2018 at 08:16 PM.

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  21. #80
    The Blue Files OldSchoolerSimpsons's Avatar
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    Simpsons Comics #245



    Bye, Bye, Bunny!

    Probably one of the things I dreaded reading the most. Not because I didn't look forward to it, but due to the fact that it was the final ever published story.
    So how does it work as a goodbye to the series?

    The opening page with Homer telling everyone to pack their bags seems to be a nod to You Only Move Twice, mainly because in both instances he calls it a stinktown.

    The story quickly gets to the point, with Marge and the kids going to the petshop. I like Bart thanking his mom for ignoring the voice in the head that would otherwise tell her how wrong it is to buy her son a slingshot. "I can hear the cries of anguish already!" Once they enter the store we get to see Raphael, which is always nice. When he says "So we can pass the savings onto you!" however my mind automatically springs to Al Harrington. Oh, how I love that guy.
    The designs of the mutated animals are pretty funny, especially the frog with an extra arm stuck to its face.
    Eventually, Marge has to settle with the least weird-looking animal, in this case being a rabbit with one ear.

    When Homer visits the bar a bit earlier than usual due to getting a bonus from Mr. Burns (which sounds suspicious already), we get an amusing meta throwback when Homer is too stupid to remember he once turned into a giant due to an experimental ray used on him. Although Moe claiming it happened "last year" doesn't make more sense, as there's clearly been a huge passage of time since. I guess that's the kind of problem you bump into with a floating timeline. The best joke of the scene however has to be Moe's list of Deadbeats Whose Legs I Gotta Break where for some weird reason he has the Bongo Comics inker Mike Rote on it.

    We later cut to Bart and Lisa at the house, where Bart is upset because the bunny ripped his comics apart. The odd thing? They happen to be Bongo Comics. Comics Book Guy is brought in to rant about them, where he funnily enough keeps reading Bongo Comics even though he hates them, just because the first thousand out of three thousand issues were "decent". Of course, he's only there so the bunny can rip up his shirt with the Bongo logo on it. He even admits it himself he's only there to "advance the plot".

    Mr. Burns has called Homer in to a work meeting, but misunderstands the instructions and takes his entire family with him. It's here that the story directly becomes a sequel to Simpsons Comics #1, since Mr. Burns wants to experiment on Homer with a growth ray again, this time with added security to make sure nothing goes wrong. Dr. Olderman even makes a re-appearance. This is the biggest highlight for me, since it kinda brings the whole Simpsons Comics universe full-circle, similiar to the original idea for how the TV series would end with them harkening back to Simpsons Roasting Over An Open Fire.
    But of course, there's a twist this time, that being how the bunny gets in the way and becomes big instead. After it starts going around destroying the town, Bart utters the funniest line in the entire comic:
    "Bongo Comics is the worst thing to ever happen to The Simpsons!"

    To save the town, Maggie makes herself bigger in order to stop her dear pet. Moe finding Maggie adorable despite now practically being an indestructible monster is chuckleworthy, but after that we unfortunately get the first failed bit, and that's Milhouse whipping out his phone to take a photo of the fight (or so he thinks at least) and upload it to Instagram. It's not as bad as the show itself trying to be hip, but still kinda pointless and cringeworthy.
    You soon find out the reason the bunny hates Bongo so much is because of other bunnies being trapped in a crate which says "Gibbon Gone", with emphasis on the Bongo part (mysteriously also surrounded by a yellow square). It's fittingly silly how this would make the bunny obviously think that Bongo Comics must be behind it. Maggie lets the bunnies out and everything is fine.

    But Homer is sad since Mr. Burns called the whole deal off. He can't even take his family out for frosty chocolate milkshakes, or he can, but only has money enough for one. Bart gets the clever idea to buy one and then enlarge it so much they can literally bathe in it. I love that they went with Homer wanting to take the family out for frosty chocolate milkshakes. Talk about really winding back time!

    It's not the greatest plot even with the revelation of it as a sequel to the very first issue, but still a fun enough read to end the Simpsons Comics saga on. Nathan Kane is not as funny of a writer as Ian Boothby or Chuck Dixon, but he injects enough humor in order for it to work.

    Farewell, Simpsons Comics. It's been a pleasure reading you.

    OVERALL RATING: 8.2/10




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