View Poll Results: How would you rate this episode?

Voters
364. You may not vote on this poll
  • 5/5

    136 37.36%
  • 4/5

    130 35.71%
  • 3/5

    68 18.68%
  • 2/5

    16 4.40%
  • 1/5

    14 3.85%
Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 208



Thread: Rate & Review: "Fat Man and Little Boy" (FABF21)



(Users Browsing this Thread: )

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    where is everyone Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    huntsville, al
    Posts
    19,463


    Rate & Review: "Fat Man and Little Boy" (FABF21)

    From SNPP

    When Bart loses his last baby tooth, his solution to his "ten-year-old's midlife crisis" is to start writing slogans on T-shirts, and soon he's a gag T-shirt salesman, much to the dismay of Homer, who thinks that with Bart bringing in income, Homer is no longer needed
    You can view the preview/speculation thread for more details.

    The thread and poll will open once the episode airs.

  2. #2
    Mod, eh? Tomacco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,789


    Despite so much going on in this episode, I can't find a single direct complaint to make on anything. The episode began strictly on the Bart dynamic and fluidly directed more attention to Homer's angle for the episode's second half, while certainly not forgetting Bart. The conclusion came a little sudden and undramatically, but it still was a good ending. In terms of humor, there was plenty. Homer put on a very very fine performance in this one. Laughs from him began right off the bat to his reactions to Lisa and Janey's clapping rhyme, and kept coming in scenes like where he's surfing the net and watching Declan Desmond's documentary on lions. The Goose Gladwell character was suitably wacky as well. The direction (while obviously not as good as say Lauren Macmullan's) was also noticeably good in this episode.

    Also, two weeks in a row with cut scenes in the end credits. Can you say "new Simpsons tradition"? I hope so. And what a nice way to give Fox the finger for cutting their credits. This scene, like last week's, was also funny.

    More thoughts later, but solid episode.
    Signature.

  3. #3


    I believe the Ms. Suzy had a Steamboat scene was something that was cut from When Flanders Failed, wasn't it? Nice to see it here fourteen years later.

  4. #4
    we go play hoop vox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    stanford, bitches (bitches referring to the bitches at stanford, not you)
    Posts
    3,708


    Quote Originally Posted by Random Viewer Guy
    I believe the Ms. Suzy had a Steamboat scene was something that was cut from When Flanders Failed, wasn't it? Nice to see it here fourteen years later.
    Yeah, looks like they found the joke file.


  5. #5
    I'm baaaack! Patches O'houlihan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Wisconsin: "More bars in more places."
    Posts
    14,121
    Blog Entries
    1


    Well, like the last few holdovers, the first 2.5 acts were good to great, but the last couple of minutes go fruity.

    All I'll say is 3/5.


    Well, ya'know if you stay positive and forget about trivial things like "proper characterization," "Satire," and "emotional depth" watching new Simpsons episodes can be a seemingly enjoyable lie.

    "One of the keys to life is having a sense of proportion, knowing how long to sit at a restaurant after you've eaten, or how long you should go on vacation — if you go to Hawaii for a month on vacation, I guarantee you that by the end you'll hate it. So it's the same with a TV show, you want to do a certain amount of it, so that when people look back on it and they love it. I could have easily done the show for one or two or three more years, but it would have changed the way people look back at it. I think I made the right decision. Because people like the show now even more than they did in the 1990s, because it didn't get worn out." -- Jerry Seinfeld

  6. #6
    scissors on his fuckin head That Jerk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    The Corporate Institutional Bank of Time
    Posts
    1,400


    Great couch gag, good solid episode. First the bad stuff.. the act breaks were terrible. They went off on the poorest jokes, and seemed very abrupt. There were a lot of great gags, but the pacing of them were just as slow as the previous Marge episodes.
    I still don't know what to think about this return to real-world form for the Simpsons. As classic as it feels to have the family deal with relatable problems, i sometimes have that crazy rediculous bloodlust that needs to be quenched every few eps. Even the gags, while brilliant in this ep lacked the visual impulsiveness I've been used to from the simpsons. But hey, it's nice to keep seeing the show still keep coming up with original ways to tell jokes without competing with the louder cartoons that Simpsons haters prefer.
    Anyway, the good stuff... Very intelligent dialogue in this episode. I'm forgetting some of them because there were so many great ones. Still in my mind is the insurance selling action figure coming back (the first appearance was lame, the second great). Krusty's P-inC t-shirt sales pitch. Moe's reference to the bastardization of Calvin & Hobbes by peddlers (I HATE those "Calvin pissing" stickers SO MUCH!). "Machine will not actually sort change" And what gave me the biggest laugh, a look into Goose Gladwell's dark mind with the short quip of Vietnam history. As for the visual gags, the rock key gag was great and funnier the second time. And i was expecting Homer to just punch Gladwell's lights out before he finished his "you better not hurt me" type speech, but they took the well paced route. It just all caught me off gaurd, but in a good way.
    Good thing the gags were so great, because i didn't find myself excited about the story at all, although Bart writing on his t-shirts reminded me of being in Catholic school and finding ways to write on my uniform to get attention without detention (no rhyme intended, sorry). The only time i was really felt drawn in by the plot was after Homer quit the plant and began "retirement". Once the act break hit, it was back to enjoying each little moment for what it provided. But hey, they were really funny. Both of Flanders' lines were hilarious too.

    3/5 - I'm probably being too hard on this one for having such a weak pace cuz i laughed the whole way through. Maybe it'll change after i download it tonight.
    Last edited by That Jerk; 12-12-2004 at 06:11 PM.

  7. #7
    Junior Camper
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    66


    3/5

  8. #8


    3/5

    There were some drop-dead hilarious moments, but I was really irritated by the disjointedness of the episode. I really thought the whole Bart-grows-up s/l was going somewhere; instead it was just being used to launch a completely other s/l about *gag* t-shirts. It seems as if the writers cannot do a half hour plot anymore; a Simpsons episode now has to become a sketch comedy show or something with a bunch of non-related gags stitched together. That's why I thought last week's show was better (gave it a 5/5)-- it was a solid half hour plot, not one of those deals where you're not sure what the show is about.

    I liked the funny gags guy (the dude who buys Bart's t-shirts), but I really wish the episode had not drawn him to look exactly like Willy Wonka. The writers keep doing this thing where they now include well known fictional characters from pop culture in their episodes (like the "Yeeeesssss" guy). To people old enough to remember these characters, this doesn't strike us as cute or funny-- just a sign of unoriginality.

    Loved Eric Idle's appearance-- the part he voiced over (the nature show) was hysterical.

  9. #9


    Quote Originally Posted by Spooner
    I had the feeling with the very first scene (Homer's reactions to Lisa's calpping game) that they were setting me up for a massive disappointement.
    What a great attitude to go in with!!

    And yet they didn't, it all turned around with the scene at the expo. Starting with the "Made for children, BY children" line.
    Homer's "You broke in!" line made me laugh for some reason.And the only other real memorable joke was the Krusty Brand Geiger Counter.

    4 slash 5!!!!
    So, three "memorable" jokes is enough to earn a 4/5 from you?
    I honestly just don't understand some of the knee-jerkers on this board.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldCootAbe
    Meh. 3/5 Grade: C

    Again, a lot of funny one liners, but the plot was stupid. Pretty much the same thing I have said about every epsiode this season. I think the fact here that these episodes are so well recieved here means the bar has been lowered for most of you. I still hold the show to a higher standard, and it has failed me yet again.
    I think that this was more inadvertently-enlightening post about your assessment of yourself than enlightening about the actual episode.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eart
    Do you know the reasoning behind this?
    The "lip animation" for dialogue is generally done back here in L.A. - the English is more familiar, and mouth movements can be changed later in the production process to accommodate later re-writes of dialogue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake
    I'm more surprised they used a similar clapping-song in Bart Sells his Soul.
    They've also done "Bubblegum, bubblegum in a dish...", and a few other distinct skip-rope and 'patty-cake' classic songs, of which there are many, and which many young girls have been singing for generations.

    Quote Originally Posted by The "Urban" Lenny
    One thing bothers me about this episode though, how the hell could Homer build a working nuclear reactor, even with the instructions he's not smart enought to do it.
    Did anyone other than Homer claim that it actually worked as an actual reactor, and not just a device that was leaking radioactivity from the loose plutonium?

    -So, what happened to Rod & Todd taking part in the spitball fight?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eart
    Oh and can anyone tell me why Poochie was Blue?
    Intentional. "Slave labor - you get what you pay for."

    - Some great gag-runs, a la the T-shirts in general, the parodies of classic games (esp. "Ravenous, Ravenous Rhinos"), the novelty devices, and Krusty T-shirts at the convention.

    -Loved the true-to-life scene of the moment when Bart 'puts aside' his 'childish things' with his new perspective, for the "Viking funeral".

    -Liked the way Desmond was just sort of 'dropped in' casually, without much 'fanfare' for the cameo.

    -Sort of mixed about Hank re-using his "Seuss"-ian voice for Goose, but at least it worked in context. (The line - which I can't recall word-for-word - about 'trusting kids with an older, unmarried guy with a goofy sensibility' was razor-sharp. Jafar mentioned my other fave - Martin's robot's "creepy" line.

    Quote Originally Posted by simpsonsbabe
    I liked the funny gags guy (the dude who buys Bart's t-shirts), but I really wish the episode had not drawn him to look exactly like Willy Wonka. The writers keep doing this thing where they now include well known fictional characters from pop culture in their episodes (like the "Yeeeesssss" guy). To people old enough to remember these characters, this doesn't strike us as cute or funny-- just a sign of unoriginality.
    Right - they're just doing it "now". Forget about Krusty, McBain, Itchy, Scratchy, Quimby, Radioactive Man, the Myers family, Lucious Sweet, Tatum, etc. And the "Yesss Guy" is based not a 'fictional' character, but one character actor that used his own catch-phrase in many separate 'fictional' roles. (And I'm aware that some of the ones I listed are based not on "fictional" people - but they are[ based on the pop-culture caricatures of them, rather than the 'real' items.)

    It's hardly a sign of "unoriginality" - when you see the obvious "Wonka" look, its a parody that tells you all that you need to know about this one-episode guy without having to do any additional exposition - the picture is worth a thousand words. They're then free to totally subvert the one-note character, with the 'creepy' overtones, the 'Nam references to his sanity, and the fact that he rips off Bart, as opposed to the 'real' Wonka of that story. (Its also a nice subtle criticism of "Wonka" in that a magical, goofy guy with a whimsical bag of tricks would actually be far more suited to running a novelty-item business than running a candy-factory.)

  10. #10


    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Myers III
    Right - they're just doing it "now". Forget about Krusty, McBain, Itchy, Scratchy, Quimby, Radioactive Man, the Myers family, Lucious Sweet, Tatum, etc. And the "Yesss Guy" is based not a 'fictional' character, but one character actor that used his own catch-phrase in many separate 'fictional' roles. (And I'm aware that some of the ones I listed are based not on "fictional" people - but they are[ based on the pop-culture caricatures of them, rather than the 'real' items.)
    Every character you mentioned are PARODIES of well known celebrities and pop culture icons that all make statements about the people they are making fun of. Kennedy is a disgusting womanizer; Schwarzennegar is a vain, dull-witted foreign action star who takes himself too seriously; Hollywood people (like Krusty) are showbiz whores; Tyson is an effeminate talking moron, etc. But the Yesss Guy and the Willy Wonka character we saw last night are not parodies; they are the actual characters themselves in different form. And the Yesss Guy WAS a fictional character. Simply redefining him as Frank Nelson with a catch phrase is not accurate AT ALL. Nelson played MANY characters, but that character was the most famous one he played-- that of an irritating service person or desk clerk.

    Did anyone other than Homer claim that it actually worked as an actual reactor, and not just a device that was leaking radioactivity from the loose plutonium?
    In the poster's defense (the one who complained about Homer being too dumb to have built the device), the mini reactor had to have worked for a joke later on in the episode to be funny. Later on Homer threatens the gags guy with nuclear annihilation. What would have been the point of all those crazy buttons on the dial he was turning if they didn't actually work?

  11. #11
    the avatar stays Spooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,019


    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Myers III
    What a great attitude to go in with!!



    So, three "memorable" jokes is enough to earn a 4/5 from you?
    I honestly just don't understand some of the knee-jerkers on this board.


    Heh, RMIII isn't satisfied with someone else's opinion, I'm startled.



    Now I can't rally blame you for not knowing me real well, but A) I have a bad memory and B) it's hard to get anything more than a 3/5 out of me.

    You're blaming me for having a bad attitude after seeing nothing but mediocre episodes all year, then seeing a mediocre beginning to this episode? I'm not allowed to see this as a bit of a bad omen for the rest of the episode? And yet then I still had a good enough attitude to find the rest of the episode very good.

    I can laugh hysterically through an episode of something and as soon as it's over I don't remember a single word they said. I don't know why, that's just how my short term memory is.

    And yet despite this I came away knowing that I enjoyed this episode. We're ghoing to complain about satisfying the customer now? Sorry? Am I supposed to apologize?



  12. #12
    Get your weapons ready! Icedragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Towson, MD
    Posts
    950


    Quote Originally Posted by Spooner
    I can laugh hysterically through an episode of something and as soon as it's over I don't remember a single word they said. I don't know why, that's just how my short term memory is.
    Putting down the bong will help with that...

    anyway, this episode had great humor, and a nice paced plot. I wasnt thrilled with Homer's line, "I have no indoor voice", or that it was the last joke of the act break, but other than that, a B+/A- ep.



  13. #13
    the avatar stays Spooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,019


    Quote Originally Posted by Icedragon
    Putting down the bong will help with that...

    anyway, this episode had great humor, and a nice paced plot. I wasnt thrilled with Homer's line, "I have no indoor voice", or that it was the last joke of the act break, but other than that, a B+/A- ep.

    You know I don't smoke. =P

  14. #14


    Quote Originally Posted by Spooner
    RMIII isn't satisfied with someone else's opinion, I'm startled.
    Oh, please - it's actually quite refreshing to see you break down and compliment a show.

    But if you don't see the humor in re-reading your post ("I was ready to be disappointed - but there were three memorable jokes - 4/5!!"), then, as far as I'm concerned, you're not smoking enough pot!


    Quote Originally Posted by Simpsonsbabe
    Every character you mentioned are PARODIES of well known celebrities and pop culture icons that all make statements about the people they are making fun of. Kennedy is a disgusting womanizer; Schwarzennegar is a vain, dull-witted foreign action star who takes himself too seriously; Hollywood people (like Krusty) are showbiz whores; Tyson is an effeminate talking moron, etc. But the Yesss Guy and the Willy Wonka character we saw last night are not parodies; they are the actual characters themselves in different form. And the Yesss Guy WAS a fictional character. Simply redefining him as Frank Nelson with a catch phrase is not accurate AT ALL. Nelson played MANY characters, but that character was the most famous one he played-- that of an irritating service person or desk clerk.
    Nope.

    I’m having the same problem with your second post that I did with your first post, because you are still mixing your definitions. Let’s walk through this slowly:

    I was responding to your defining point in the first post, in which you classified those characters as evidencing “sign[s] of unoriginality”:

    The writers keep doing this thing where they now include well known fictional characters from pop culture in their episodes (like the "Yeeeesssss" guy).
    I thought that I knew where you were going with this – but, by including TYG, you muddied the waters. Because Frank Nelson was indeed a “real” person. He was famous for playing the same exact character in many sketch shows and series, with the exact same inflections and, yes, catch-phrase. Part of the joke about his appearances in those shows was that, despite his characters having different names in each appearance – he was the exact same character. The character was a “construct” appearing in many revues and different tv shows, not singly bound to any “one work of fiction” (therefore, not really a ‘fictional character), usually as an “irritating service person or desk clerk,” and he was only ever performed by Frank Nelson. No one else ever turned around to Lucy, revealing his face, and said “Yyesssss?” The joke was dependant upon the real person’s face being revealed. As opposed to, say, your example of Wonka – who is entirely fictional, and has (for the most part) the same recognizable “look”, regardless of whether it’s the original book’s illustrations, as played by Gene Wilder, or as played by Johnny Depp. The OFF version didn’t even exactly match any of these embodiments; his coat, tie, top-hat, and manner of speaking and playing “gags” are what conveyed his clear inspiration.

    So, if you’re going to group those two types together, fine. But it actually doesn’t make a bit of difference: both types of characters have had a long history of making appearances in OFF, from its earliest days and throughout, in single-, recurring-, and even featured-roles in Springfield. I hope to cover all of your various “interpretations” of your terms:

    Here are some characters that are, in the manner of Goose Gladwell (Willy Wonka), parodies of entirely fictional characters from “pop culture” works of fiction (or that at least began in that fashion – with more appearances, they obviously take on a life of their own): Bumblebee Man (Chesperito, of Mexican television comedy), Dr. Hibbert (Dr, Theo Huxtable), Frink (The Nutty Professor), Lyle Lanley (Harold Hill), Sharry Bobbins (Mary Poppins), Happy Little Elves (The Smurfs), Rex Banner (Elliot Ness, via “The Untouchables”), The Amendment (The ‘Schoolhouse Rock’ Bill), Krusty Burglar & Rib-it (The Hamburglar & Grimace), Hank Scorpio (various Bond villains), James Bont, (Bond), McGarnigle (Harry Callahan), KnightBoat & Michael (KITT & Michael), Dr. Colossus (Dr. Sivana), Sarah Sloan (Julia Roberts’ character in “Notting Hill”), Moe’s waitress Collette (Diane Chambers), Wally Weasel (Chuck E. Cheese), Vet Surgeon (Dr. Ben Casey), Gil (Lemmon’s “Glengarry” character), Suds McDuff (Spuds McKenzie), Chief (from “Cukoo’s Nest”), Malibu Stacey (Barbie), Ozmodiar (The Great Gazoo), Menthol Moose (Joe Camel), Hosey the Bear (Smokey).

    And, despite how you frame your reply, you can add to that some of the ones that included in my first list: McBain began on the show as a parody of the interchangeable fictional characters that Arnold played – not Arnold himself. That came seasons later, as they developed Rainier Wolfcastle’s “real” life. Krusty began life as a parody of fictional regional television clowns, and not as a living embodiment of “showbiz whores”. Itchy & Scratchy were a parody of cartoon-mayhem cat & mouse teams, most notably Tom & Jerry. Radioactive Man is a parody of comic-book heroes at large. And so on, etc, - this is not an exhaustive list.

    Now, on the other hand, suppose that you meant ‘parodies of pop-culture personas – either understood as ‘images’ that performing celebs put on in public or via their ‘acts’ (like, say, Frank Nelson), or as the stereotypes that pop culture came to reflect on celebs, regardless of the actual “truth” of these reflections (which was the purpose of my explanation in parenthesis). In these categories, the show has given us:

    Moe (Red, of “The Red Tapes”), Rachel (Amy Grant), Brad Goodman (John Bly), Birch Barlow (Rush Limbaugh), Arthur Fortune (Richard Branson), Jerry Rude (Howard Stern), The Leader (L. Ron Hubbard), Randall Curtis (George Lucas), Emily Winthrop (Barbara Woodhouse), Smooth Jimmy Apollo (Jimmy the Greek), Hooray for Everything (Up With People), Captain Lance Murdock (Evel Kenieval), Gunter & Ernst (Sigfried & Roy), Larry Burns (Rodney’s act persona), and June Bellamy (June Foray).

    You can add to that the remaining ones I first listed: Quimby (as much a parody of Teddy Kennedy as John F.), Tatum & Sweet (Tyson & King), and Myers (Disney).

    Again, these aren’t exhaustive lists. You may have “not liked” Goose, or disagree that his presentation was a good choice - your opinion is entirely valid (just like Spooner's) – but what you can’t do is claim that his use is a “new thing” that “they keep doing” only recently.

    In the poster's defense (the one who complained about Homer being too dumb to have built the device), the mini reactor had to have worked for a joke later on in the episode to be funny. Later on Homer threatens the gags guy with nuclear annihilation. What would have been the point of all those crazy buttons on the dial he was turning if they didn't actually work?
    Keeping in mind that this show is a cartoon and need not be ‘realistic’ in any sense, you can’t make a reactor that small, there was no sign that the “dials” actually increased the “reaction” (after all, it was glowing from the get-go,) rather than, say, decreasing the shielding, or doing something else, or nothing at all. Indeed, how would Goose have known either way? He had a crazy guy holding a device that evidenced radiation leakage threatening him. It was immaterial “how” or even “if” it worked as a controlled-nuclear-energy-production device – and all we know about Homer indicates that he couldn’t have built such a device.

    Welcome to the board!

  15. #15


    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Myers III
    Welcome to the board!
    Thanks for the welcome, Roger. It's greatly appreciated.

    Sorry, I'm not going to address the rest of your post, because it was just too exhausting to read and respond to. You basically over-analyzed everything to death; it was practically a filibuster.

  16. #16
    It tastes like burning!
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    202


    Meh. Not very good. There was a bad plot, but the jokes were ok. Like the joke about Korean animation was pretty funny...
    NEW EPS OF FAMILY GUY MAY 1ST!!!

  17. #17
    "As Felt in Braille Weekly"
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    33


    I really enjoyed this episode. It wasn't weird or confusing.

    I also liked the "Hello Operator" line being reused!

  18. #18
    the avatar stays Spooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,019


    I had the feeling with the very first scene (Homer's reactions to Lisa's calpping game) that they were setting me up for a massive disappointement. And yet they didn't, it all turned around with the scene at the expo. Starting with the "Made for children, BY children" line.

    Homer's "You broke in!" line made me laugh for some reason.

    And the only other real memorable joke was the Krusty Brand Geiger Counter.

    4 slash 5!!!!

  19. #19
    Nothin' wrong with that!
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    480


    Yeah, I thought this episode was really great. I laughed from the beginning to the end.

    I don't have any complaints whatsoever.

  20. #20


    I loved the episode, everything clicked in it. Definitely my favorite episode this season. Seeing Homer and Lisa work well together was heart-warming, and the whole ep just ruled.

  21. #21
    slammin' J.Re*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    The Past
    Posts
    7,502


    great jokes. good main plot. lisa plot almost fucked it all up and was completely unnecessary, but they strayed away at a good time.
    overall good. had me worried

  22. #22
    what's an applebees Necromancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    sioux falls, sd
    Posts
    9,849


    Good jokes throughout. The plot chaged way too quickly in the third act. Overall it was pretty good. 4/5...maybe.


    i am the killer dressed in pilgrim's clothing.

  23. #23
    Can't Talk. Eating.
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Little Pwagmattasquarmsettport
    Posts
    406


    Thumbs Up

    It was a pretty good episode. However, I'm finding these end of episode cutaways weirder and weirder. The best joke was the joke about the Korean animation!
    Top 2 jokes:

    2.Somebody had to take the babysitter home. Then I noticed she was sitting on-her-sweet-can. So I grabbed-her-sweet can. Oh, just thinking about-her-can. I just wish I had-her-sweet-sweet-s-s-sweet can!

    1. Homer-Hey you $#@*, you cut me off. $#*@ to you!
    Lisa- Dad, that's an ambulance
    Homer-Right, honey. Hey ambulance! You think you're so big with your $@#^ *%$# siren. And your letters are on backwards!

    Top 3 THOH Qoutes:

    3. Selma as Homer runs naked across kitchen-There goes the last lingering thread of my heterosexuality.
    2. Delirious Mr. Burns-I was walking through the gas one day!
    1. Flanders-Hey, Homer, mind if I chew your ear
    (Homer shoots Flanders)
    Bart-Dad, you killed the zombie Flanders
    Homer-He was a zombie?

  24. #24
    don't mind chopping wood Jake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bowling Green, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    8,877


    Quality episode and as mentioned above Homer's showing was strong, but there never really was a problem and all was well. 4/5.
    blog - music - movies
    Peace of mind. A mellow life. Crunk music. Investing in spy equipment and communist memorabilia. Having dance contests with myself. Placing last in the local triathlon. All of these things, plus a firm belief in the Lord.

  25. #25
    Galalimit
    Guest


    This episode was pure genius. Tons of humor and a great plot. It was a nice change to have Bart in the spotlight for once. 5 out of 5. Hooray to the end of Marge Mania.

  26. #26
    hi kevin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    32,594


    liked it a lot. funny, and a good story. kind of two differnt plots coming together, but it worked well. best so far of the short season. A-

  27. #27
    Hired Goon
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    14,637


    That was a pretty good episode. Funny, enjoyable story and solid laughs all the way through. While nothing really stood out as outstanding, what was there was funny and there really wasn't anything to complain about. One of the best of this early season, which really doesn't say much, but still a solid episode.

    4/5, B+

  28. #28
    freedom. silence. always.
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    4,158


    4/5

    pretty damn good. good plot and lots of jokes

  29. #29
    Just some guy in the back
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    117


    Not bad. It gets a solid 5/5 IMO.
    Just some guy in the back.

  30. #30
    No wonder he won Minnesota. Sarcastic Guy II's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Bethlehem, PA
    Posts
    855


    Very cute episode. Homer loving his kids, and finally, an episode where he isn't choking Bart for the slightest thing. It was nice to see him and Lisa enjoy terrorising Flanders too.

    Osama Bin Scratchy was a bit risque, but still funny. Very solid episode.

    4/5
    I was saying "Boo-urns."

    Season 19 Ratings:
    He Loves to Fly and He D'ohs - A
    The Homer of Seville - C+
    Midnight Towboy - A+
    I Don't Wanna Know Why The Caged Bird Sings - A

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •